Aug200912
Artist Profile: Yoni Zilber
12:08 PM
yoni3.jpgWhen I decided to dedicate my right sleeve to the history of Israel and the Jewish people, I chose my artist based upon unusual criteria. Not only was Yoni Zilber a talented tattooist with a detailed style, capable of a variety of different looks, but, also, he was born in the Motherland. He was a Jew! And, an Israeli Jew at that!

I considered that my sittings would be a religious experience of sorts, but Yoni is quiet and reflective. He doesn't bustle with the energy of the Tel Aviv nightlife and, while he has the sarcasm and dry wit of most Israelis, he is far more serene and measured in his approach.

Sitting with Yoni was a contemplative experience, a meditation in mind-body connection more reminiscent of the Tibetan influences coloring Yoni's work than of any specific time or place.

At Brooklyn Adorned where he works, he attempts to describe the world of tattoo to my very narrow mind, specifically exploring the what life is like for a Jew who tattoos.

You are one of the more well known Israeli tattoo artists -- do you think that people seek you out for that reason sometimes?
I think so. I do get to work a lot when I'm going to Israel.


Do you ever get asked to do Jewish or Israeli themed tattoos?

Yes, I work in New York, and it happens more here than in Israel. [laughs]

Do you ever get asked to do racist or other stuff? How do you handle that?
If it is for racist reasons, I'll refuse. But, if you want a swastika on your Buddha cloth, I'll do it.

Is Israeli stuff your style or do you tattoo other themes?
Tibetan art is my main focus and the style I want to tattoo as well.

What is tattoo culture like in Israel?
Israel is a hot country and it's more of a beach culture so, mostly black & gray tattoos, but no specific style. Its influence comes from both from Europe and the States.

yoni2.jpgYou have traveled the world. Where is the tattoo culture most prevalent? The weakest?
I think here in America it is strongest. There is no place in the world that you walk on the streets and, in some neighborhoods, there are more tattooed people walking on the streets than un-tattooed people. Not sure where it is the weakest, maybe Antarctica?

How do you increase your skill sets? What do you study? Who do you study with?
Traveling and working with different artists help. Tattoo conventions and just hanging out with other tattooers helps too. I'm studying Tibetan art now with master painter Pema Rinzing.

Is any of your own ink Jewish or Israeli?
I am not sure but my black ink turns white on Shabbat. [laughs]

I mean, do you have any Jewish related themes in your tattoos?
My right arm was done in Israel, but there is no Jewish meaning behind it.

Does your ink represent your tattoo style?
I do have lot of Tibetan art tattooed on me and some styles from the Far East.

If you weren't doing ink, what would you be doing?
A rabbi. Definitely a rabbi.

You can book an appointment with Yoni Zilber at Brooklyn Adorned.

3 Comments

Oh, I love Yoni! Great interview.



i would love to hear more about his opinions regarding the swastika in tattooing.



WE THINK HE IS WONDERFUL TOO... JANINE AND FREDDIE





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