Jan201413
My Chat with Greece's Heartbeat Ink
07:30 AM
Marisa Kakoulas_web.jpg
Having a Greek father who once told me that tattoos would never be accepted in the motherland, it's with true pleasure (and a bit of "I told ya so") to see a tattoo publication rise to international popularity, which happens to come out of Greece.

HEARTBEATINK is an online tattoo magazine in English and Greek with excellent photography and videos, and thoughtful interviews with tattooists, musicians, and collectors
. I'm honored to be among those collectors interviewed by the magazine's most excellent editor Ino Mei. Our Q &A was just posted today.

I first met Ino in person at the last NYC Tattoo Convention, where she beautifully captured the scene in her convention coverage for her mag. Then we got to hang at the London Tattoo Convention in September, for which she also took wonderful images and video. There, we found a moment to chat about a possible "tattoo gene," the comparisons between tattooing & plastic surgery, tattoo law, and what happened when my dad did find out I was heavily tattooed (and more). It was a fun talk. Here's a bit from it:

 How did you get into tattoos?

Me:  Ed Hardy once told me in an interview that he believes that there could be a "tattoo gene." It made a lot of sense to me because, when you ask somebody who has a visceral response to tattooing -- who sees tattooing and has an actual physical reaction and is attracted to it -- that is something that's ingrained; people can think back and say,  "Well, I've always felt that way".  I remember when I was very young, looking at my mother's National Geographic magazines and coming across tattooed tribal women, and I was instantly thinking that this is really beautiful, mysterious and bad-ass. Of course, this is an ideal way of looking at it. really, if I would be honest with myself, it is because I liked tattooed boys when I was teenager (laughs).

HEARTBEATINK: Where you then tattooed when you were a teenager?

I was a nerdy teenager, did good in school, and my parents were very conservative. I didn't run around a lot. So when I found myself at tattoo shops at a young age, it held a kind of magic for me. Keep in mind that getting a tattoo was illegal back then, until 1997, in New York, so it was more secretive. You had to know where to go and ring the right buzzer. It was like a clandestine operation. However, when you were "inside", it wasn't what you'd expect, like a biker shop. At least in my experience, when I was first exposed to it, I was seeing really beautiful custom tattooing. There were art books rather than trendy flash for inspiration. I respected it so much that I felt I really wanted to wait until a had the right idea and do it at the right time. So, I didn't get tattooed until I was in my early twenties. Actually, I got my first tattoo during the early weeks of law school. I felt I didn't fit it, and was afraid that I'd become something that I wasn't. I love the study of law, but I've never been super competitive and I've never felt that I had to be above somebody else to be better. It was really at that time that I started thinking about art and tattooing a lot in terms of individuation.

HEARTBEATINK: That sounds very mature...

I was a very mature kid (laughs). Now, I'm regressing. I'm like a thirteen-year-old boy (laughs). Back then, I was like a forty year old women (laughs).

...
Read more here.


HEARTBEATINK also posted some photos from my latest book, Black Tattoo Art 2. Tons of tattoo goodness!


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EDITOR IN CHIEF:
Marisa Kakoulas
CONTRIBUTORS:
Miguel Collins
Craig Dershowitz
Brian Grosz
Sean Risley
Patrick Sullivan
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