Results tagged “Argentina”

May201511
07:54 AM
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Just before my 30th birthday, around 12 years ago, I started thinking about tattooing my body in one complete overall look. Going beyond just some cool pieces that I already had, I began envisioning a body suit (one that could be covered under business suits for work) in ornamental blackwork patterns, like what you'd find on ancient Greek vases. I wanted something feminine and graceful and -- like those vases that remained intact over millennia -- powerful and timeless.

And as luck would have it, I happened to be married to a renowned blackwork tattooer, Daniel DiMattia of Calypso Tattoo in Belgium. Moving toward the blackwork bodysuit I wanted, Dan created (during our marriage and afterward as good friends) beautiful works for my sleeves and backpiece, ribs and stomach, my snake hips, thigh, shin, and even a fancy foot. And there's more planned with Dan for the future.

With lots of room on my legs, however, I thought it would be a great opportunity to collect work from another artist, but whose style could harmonize with my existing tattoos. I had a particular artist in mind, one whose work I had been admiring since I first saw it around 2003 online: Nazareno Tubaro in Buenos Aires, Argentina.

Nazareno, Naza for short, has a portfolio that spans from strong heavy black to refined and delicate dots. Naza masters how those designs fit with the shape of the body, so that they beautifully complement the wearer. I had featured Naza'a work on my old Needled.com blog, as well as Needles & Sins, and he has been a part of both of my Black Tattoo Art books, and in Tattoo World.  In working together on these projects, we became friends, and I knew that if he tattooed me, I would not only have gorgeous tattoos, but also a lot of fun. I was absolutely right.

Finding the opportunity to take a week off from work, I booked my tattoo vacation to Buenos Aires, leaving May 1st, and arriving back to NYC yesterday. Naza suggested that we start on one leg, my left one, which had existing work from Dan, so that I would have one complete piece first, before moving on to my right leg, which didn't have any work other than my snake. We'd tattoo for three days, spacing out the sessions for rest and healing. I also didn't want to immediately jump on a 10 1/2 hour plane ride after our last session. I worked out the details with Naza's assistant Ander, and the schedule was all set in advance.

Prior to my arrival, I had sent Naza some photos of my leg, and also indicated which tattoos he had done in the past on others that I really liked, so he had some idea of what I was looking for. [Naturally, this was only for reference, and never to copy an original custom tattoo.] I didn't even think to ask in advance of our first session for any sketch or preview of the design because I trusted that Naza would come up with something that I would love. That trust is key for me.

tattoo freehand.jpgThe day I arrived in Argentina, Naza and his girlfriend Xoanna picked me up from my hotel, just a few blocks from Naza's private tattoo studio in the hip Palermo Hollywood area of Buenos Aires. They took me for the yummy steaks the country is known for, some sightseeing, and I also got to hang out and watch the practice for his band Ruda, in which Naza plays a mean bass.

[Obvious note on tattoo vacations: You want to load up on the sightseeing prior to any major work because of swelling and just general fatigue after long painful sessions. Save the post-tattoo days for book reading and flooding your friends' social media feeds, as I did.]

On the day of our first appointment, Naza showed me what he had sketched out -- and it was perfect. Floral ornamental designs, of varying shapes, to be lined and filled with dots. We then took some time to find the proper placement, to fit my body and existing tattoos. Naza also drew freehand along with the design stencil so that there was a seamless flow.

With all that done, it was time to tattoo. Prior to the session, I had taken about 5 droppers of Pamela Shaw's Quaternity Holistics "Pain-Free Tincture", which is an all-natural tincture to help pain sensitivity, and it chills you out. I also had a bottle of Advil in my bag, in case I was really in pain.

Tattoos hurt. We all know this. And tattoos on the knee and in the knee ditch are a particular bitch. Gratefully, however, Naza works super-fast, as well as meticulously, and he's also a "light-touch," in that you don't feel that he's drilling into you. He asked me what my favorite music was, and played Nick Cave and PJ Harvey, some of our mutual favorites. He cracked jokes, and engaged in conversation, so that my focus wasn't on any discomfort. The sessions were actually ... enjoyable. You don't hear many people say that when a tattooer is running a thick black line from your ankle, up your knee, and across your thighs.

nazareno tubaro tattoo.jpgThe outline was done in one session, for what we would get done in this trip. [Some more spaces on my left leg will be filled in my next trip.] The following day I rested, keeping my leg iced and elevated. For a spaz like me, keeping still is the greatest challenge of all, but I forced myself to do something I never do: relax. [Ok, ok. I did sneak away for a bit to see some old friends from the body modification and performance scene. How could I pass up a chance to have La Negra Modified Goddess make me panquques con dulche du leche?!]

The remaining two appointments were all dotwork and some fine line fill-in. The dots were tiny and layered expertly for some buttery shading. It's a painstaking process, although, actually, less painful and easy on the skin. Naza also used fine lines as the veins of the leaves in the design for added texture. In total, just counting the time the needles were in my skin (outside of design, coffee and cookie breaks) Naza did all that work in only 6 hours!

Nevertheless, after that third and last session, I was beat. The next morning, after 9 hours of sleep, I was feeling great and took a couple of hours to sightsee. But before I did, I had wrapped my leg the night before with Saniderm aftercare medical bandages. Tattooer Jess Yen was swearing by it at the last NYC Tattoo Convention for faster healing, and to keep it safe and clean. I kept the bandages on for the next day as well, until right before I got on the plane (as I didn't want too much compression when taking the long trip). [See more on how Saniderm works here.] The final night before I left, I partied with Naza and Xoana, and made plans for my next trip back to finish the leg and then start the next one.

I am grateful, not only for the beautiful tattoo, but for the kindness and the wonderful experience I had getting tattooed. Creating that kind of experience is what distinguishes good artists from truly great ones -- ones worth flying to another continent, even with so many greatt artists in your backyard. I look forward to further tattoos and giggles soon.

For more photos, check my quick Flickr album of my sessions at Naza's studio. You can find more of Naza's work on Instagram.

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Mar201305
08:37 AM
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One of my favorite blackwork tattooers -- actually one of my favorite artists in general -- is Nazareno Tubaro of Buenos Aires, Argentina. He's no stranger to this blog, but I had to share this photo he posted on his Facebook page of work he did on a client because it is truly exemplary of how beautiful hand tattoos can be.  

Check more of Naza's work here.
Apr201106
12:51 PM


I'm loving this this playful video of blackwork badass Nazareno Tubaro, which offers an up-close look at his set-up (with a wink). The video is shot by Emiliano Vargas and Macarena Magnani, and edited by Magnani and Bruno Gradaschi (who also did the post-production work).  A fabulous collaboration.

I'm a long-time fan of Naza. [He's featured in Black Tattoo Art.] His powerful black tattoos -- from geometric dotwork to twists on Borneo tribal -- have earned him a reputation that reaches far beyond Argentina. He began his career in 1996 in his hometown of Bahia Blanca. It was at a time when information on the art of tattooing was extremely scarce. Without industry magazines or tattoo blogs to guide him, Nazareno set out for a more traditional arts education to further his craft and enrolled in the state university of fine art in Buenos Aires. He says that the lessons learned in art school opened him up to new ways of expression in his tattoo work. He continued to practice and study tattooing while at the university, and shortly after graduation, he began working as a tattoo artist professionally.

Art school, however, did not provide all Nazareno needed to know to master his craft so he traveled, visiting artists around the world, including those in Borneo, Spain and Mexico, to learn different tattoo approaches and also make a network of friends who share information and support each others' work.

In 2009, Nazareno opened his private tattoo studio in Buenos Aires. He also does frequent guest spots at Windhorse Tattoo in Sao Paulo, Brazil. Now I just need to convince him to make a trip to Brooklyn.

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