Results tagged “Athens”

Jun201403
09:58 PM
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I'm very fortunate to have shelves of beautiful tattoo and art books from artists across the globe -- books I've learned a great deal from and books that inspire posts for this blog. But it is not often that a book inspires how I envision further work on my own tattoos and has me excited about different possibilities of expression when designing the next steps of my body suit.

One such book is "Solstice Mandala" by George "Orge" Kalodimas of Sake Tattoo in Athens, Greece.

Last July, I first wrote about the Solstice Mandala project in which Orge set out to create
a mandala a day, from June 21st, the Summer Solstice, to December 21st, the Winter Solstice. And he did so. Here's more:

In the morning of 21st of June, Orge was listening to the radio and was reminded that this is the biggest day of the year. This reminder pushed him to later spend hours online learning about the Solstice circle and the unstoppable circle of life every year since the beginning of time. That's when inspiration stroke. He would design one mandala per day for the next 184 days, paying tribute to the solstice. He spent every day for 6 months designing a new mandala inspired by religion, nature and sacred geometry.
Those 184 mandalas are beautifully presented in a lush, limited edition 128-page hardcover with embossed sleeve. Even more wonderful is that the book is accompanied by a signed & numbered limited print.

And the most wonderful part:  the book is available for purchase at only 75 Euros (about $102 US).

Personally, I love how Orge has created mandalas that are incredibly detailed with various patterns and imagery, but would not overwhelm the body and would translate beautifully when the art is put on skin.

For more on how Solstice Mandala came to be, check this great video below.

And for more on Orge's tattoo and fine art work, check his Facebook and Instagram pages.

May201401
08:54 AM
Kiriakos sake tattoo crew 1.jpgKiriakos sake tattoo crew 2.jpgIn Athens, Greece, the Sake Tattoo Crew is an incubator for top tattoo talent -- not just respected in the country, but worldwide. One artist from this collective is Kiriakos Balaskas. Tattooing for 8 years after a tough apprenticeship with Sake, Kiriakos developed a style combining abstract expressionism watercolors and graphic art. But I wanted to learn from him how he views his work, and tattoo culture as a whole, so I took him away from organizing the Athens Tattoo Convention, which is May 23-25, for a quick Q&A.

If forced to define your style, how would you describe it? What are the strongest influences on your work?


My tattoo style in general has always been a combination of heavy themes/ lines/ shapes, and naive -- almost childish -- color details. I've always found this invasion of joy into strictness (two sides that equally attract me) very interesting and exciting. As soon as I started experimenting with the watercolor technique, I felt I had finally found the absolute way of expressing this ultimate combination. My pieces mainly include these distinctive elements: a black graphic stencil or sketch, and either a brush or wide, "clean," kid-style watercolors -- usually two colors only. It is hard for me to define it in a sole, strict term as there is no one else in Greece who practises this style, but if forced to define it, I'd use the term my costumers use when they ask for it, "Kiddo."

Some old school artists believe that "only bold will hold," and that every tattoo needs a heavy outline to stay strong longer. What is your response to this?

I agree and I myself use total black outlines in the stencil/sketch part. But as far as the watercolors outline is concerned, I feel the lines should create an ephemeral impression -- if you take the loose element out of the watercolor, the very substance of it is gone.

Because you are doing something new and innovative with your work, what kind of reactions do you get to it?

The reactions are positive, if not overwhelming. People are interested in trying this new technique or inflowing the style into their tattoos, and their eagerness to experiment with unconventional styles sincerely moves me.

What are some of the greatest lessons you learned in tattooing?

I've learned the greatest lessons and values of tattooing from the person who initiated me to this art, Sake. It was a tough apprenticeship by his side that I had to go through in order to become a respected tattoo artist, and one of the greatest lessons he gave me was to pay this respect back to the customers. They will have that piece on them forever, and that is something we always have to keep in mind.

What do you think makes a good tattoo -- and what do you think makes a good tattoo artist?

A good tattoo is a tattoo that remains the same over the years, as if it was only done two weeks ago. I consider good artists to be the artists who won't rest or let themselves go as far as their technique, style and inspiration are concerned.

How have you seen tattoo culture in Greece evolve? How has mainstream culture in Greece adapted to the art's popularity?

It's growing stronger and stronger, meaning that it is not considered a taboo anymore. It took a long time for tattooed people not be thought of as being gang members or criminal figures! I think this progress was a combination of famous, successful people flaunting their pieces and the evolution of the Greek tattoo scene that managed to establish itself as art.

As the organizer of the Athens Tattoo Convention, what do you think are the highlights of your convention?

Except for a good sum of about 180 artists (30 of them from around the globe), the Athens Tattoo Convention combines all kinds of inspiring subcultures through BMX and skate ramps, graffiti and custom bike shows to live music and little surprises every year, from aerial dance to Fuel Girls performances. Last but not least, the venue is located by the sea side.

Personally, what do you love to do when not tattooing?

Motocross!

If you had to sum up your personal life philosophy, what would it be?
 
"Be yourself. Unless you can be a unicorn. In that case, you should always be a unicorn". I love that quote.

***
Check more of Kiriakos' work on Facebook and Instagram.

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Aug201321
09:04 AM
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My friends at the Greek tattoo magazine Heartbeat Ink have a fantastic in-depth Q&A with Mike The Athens, in English and in Greek. Tattooing for 24 years, Mike The Athens is not only one of Greece's preeminent tattooers, but has garnered international acclaim for his work, which is largely inspired by Tibetan and Himalayan Art, Sak Yant, and mantras, but also moving towards Japanese-influenced tattooing.

Today, Mike The Athens splits his time between Athens, Greece, and Goa, India. In the Heartbeat Ink interview, he explains what living and tattooing on two continents is like, how tattooers must have a conscience, and even the fun way he got his name. Here's a taste:

Where are you now in 2013?

I split my time between Athens and Goa. Things are much different in Goa now, compared to how it was fourteen years ago, when it comes to tattooing. Around 150 walk-in studios have opened and two or three private ones. Nowadays, not only tourists get tattooed, but also locals. Goa is a very advanced place. Besides the great energy it possesses, you can meet really interesting people too. Plus, you don't need to convince anyone about who you are. Most of them don't have a clue about who I am, if I'm a renowned tattoo artist or not. The relationships formed in India follow totally different patterns from the Western ones. Everything is still original to a certain point. As the years go by, things are slightly changing, but the people living there, including me, aspire to keep the originality factor alive. 

Can you describe your everyday life as a tattoo artist in Goa?

I feel sort of cut off from the international tattoo scene, since I live so far away from the rest of the world. I have time to paint, create tattoos and painting collections. I would like India to be my base in the future, as far as tattooing is concerned, and people who want to get a tattoo from me to travel all the way there to get it. Some people are already combining it. All these, whilst guest artists and my senior apprentice, Thanos, will be working in my studio in Athens.

Read more, and view some wonderful photos, here. Also check Mike The Athens' site and blog.

Mike is also one of the featured artists in Black Tattoo Art 2, which is currently available for pre-order.

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Jul201328
04:22 PM
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solstice mandala.jpgFor some positive and light inspiration, check the Solstice Mandala project by Orge of Sake Tattoo in Athens, Greece.  Since June 21st, the Summer Solstice, Orge has been creating one intricate and beautiful mandala a day, incorporating a variety of motifs including animals and elements of nature, skulls, and religious quotations, among others. Orge will continue to create these works until December 21st, the Winter Solstice, and they will culminate in a book of all his mandalas.

You can find more in Orge's Solstice Mandala Facebook Album and on Instagram.

Orge is the manager and a tattooist at Greece's renowned Sake Tattoo, and you'll find much of the sacred geometry that inspires his fine art in his tattoo work. Check him.

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Jan201203
06:12 PM
sake tattoo joker.jpgCriminality, ownership, and even secret codes among spies -- tattoos in ancient Greece largely served these purposes and it was rare to look at them as any kind of attractive adornment. In Greece today, however, there is an explosion of artful tattoos that defy the ancients and decorate their descendants in ways that have caught the attention of the international tattoo community.

One such Greek artist is Sake, of Sake Tattoo, -- a studio that has been beautifying Athens (and clients well beyond) since it opened in 2005. Sake's notable style, developed since he began tattooing in 2001, is color bombed portraits framed in graphic backgrounds, influenced by his long graffiti history. [You can still find him burning walls with his graffiti crew, the Till Death Squad.] While Greece remains a gorgeous vacation destination, here's an added reason to take a trip.

See more of Sake's work here.

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See the full size images of the tattoos in the montage above on our Flickr page.
May201014
12:53 PM


In an hour, I'll be heading to the NYC Tattoo Convention, one of my favorite shows--with its diversity of top tattoo artists and crowd of beautiful freaks--all in the historic Roseland Ballroom in Times Square. For the past ten years, I could easily be found at the main-floor bar, but this weekend, I'll be spending most of my time at the Father Panik booth, off to the side of the stage, selling my Black Tattoo Art tome alongside their kickass clothing and jewelry.

To get a preview of the show, check the Cool Hunting Video above from a few years back, which has great shots from the convention floor as well as stellar sound bits from Lucky Diamond Rich, the world's most tattooed person. I also interviewed legendary tattoo artist and activist Spider Webb who offers his infamous Webb-isms like,  "Once you drop the whole idea that you care about something, then you're really free."  I feel this way about pants.

Also check Daredevil's booth-eye view of the convention from last year.


If I wasn't staying in NYC, I'd be in the Motherland for the Fourth Annual Athens Tattoo Convention in Greece. The economy has tanked but tattooing is booming and it's very exciting to see all this wild new art in a country that is just experiencing its tattoo renaissance. When I'm there this summer, I'll add more to my Tattoos in Greece posts--found here and here.

Next weekend, we'll be heading to the Hell City Tattoo Fest in Killumbus, Ohio. Once again, Durb and the HC crew gather the very best tattoo artists from around the world, offer seminars, art shows, music performances and tons of tattoo goodness. It has really become one of the best shows in the country. Looking forward to it.


Other upcoming conventions we love:



Art shows opening this weekend...

Tomorrow, at the Last Rites Gallery in NYC, the second Flesh to Canvas group show featuring the fine art of renowned tattooists opens at 7PM. Artists include Paul Acker, Alex Adams, Guy Aitchison, Nick Baxter, Aaron Bell, Paul Booth, Joe Capobianco, Joshua Carlton, Mike DeVries, Chris Dingwell, Little Dragon, Alex Garcia, Goethe, Gunnar, Anil Gupta, Ryan Hadley, Robert Hernandez, Phil Holt, Nikko Hurtado, Brian Murphy, Roman, Juan Salgado, Stefano, Toxyc, Kurt Wiscombe and Phil Young.  

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Also opening tomorrow is Masterworks of Body Art. The exhibit at the Oceanside Museum of Art in North San Diego, CA will feature a live tattoo runway show where 45 collectors will model the work of about ten tattooists while Master of Ceremonies Jade Winn will discuss the symbolism and history behind the tattoo imagery. Artists featured include Fip Buchanan of Avalon Tattoo, Rob Benavides of Flying Panther Tattoo, Roy "Loy-Loy" Leyva of Classic Traditions Art Company, Opie Ortiz of World Famous Tattooing in Long Beach, Louis Perez II of Will Rise Tattoo in Hollywood, and Bill Canales of Full Circle Tattoo. Bill's tattoo work shown above--which we first posted here in February--will be part of the exhibit.

More events listing coming up next week.
Jul200902
12:42 PM
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I'm back from my 2-week big fat Greek wedding celebration of my best friend's nuptials (photos on my Facebook page) but it was more than just eating, drinking, dancing, eating, eating, eating ... it was also about Michael Jackson tattoos.

Specifically, I'm reporting back to y'all on some amazing work coming outta my motherland.

But before I give a list of my fave Greek tattooists, I should note that despite the Zorba-esque zestiness, jump-on-the-table-and-belly-dance desires of my peeps, it is NOT a country friendly to heavily tattooed people, especially women. In fact, it's pretty hostile, and I'm not just talking about the smaller villages but even in the big cities like Athens.

For example, in one day, I was stopped and cursed at by three different people for exercising my right to bare tattooed arms -- people who worked in tourist stores and could've taken my euros for things like erotic coasters depicting the ancients in various states of coitus.

One woman spit on the floor when she saw me, claiming I was a Satan worshipper. [Indeed, I would not deem Beyonce satan by any means!]

Of course, when I hung out with the satanists at the Rockwave Festival Tuesday, my tattoos were almost as big a hit as Mastodon, Kylesa and Lita Ford, so maybe there's something to it.

My point in writing all this is that -- while Greece remains one of the most beautiful places on earth to me, a place I go back to every year -- one must be prepared to suffer the evil eye of tattoo distaste despite the country's recent tattoo conventions and incredible local tattooists.

And speaking of, here's my pick of faves should you wish a souvenir from Greece other than the Athena is My Homegirl tee.


* Mike The AthensMike (whose work is shown here) is one of my favorite artists worldwide, even beyond Greece's borders, particularly for his Buddhist and East Asian iconography (in fact, you'll find his tattoo and fine art work in my upcoming book on blackwork). Mike takes a spiritual approach to tattooing and is part of MAHASHAKTI, a non-profit organization whose goal is to "preserve, promote and secure spiritual tattooing in our times."

* Sake Tattoo: 
For the less traditional, there's Sake, who is excellent for portraiture and new school stylings; work coming out of the shop also includes the Art Brut style popularized in France and Belgium (some work comes a bit close for comfort with artists like Yann and Jeff but I haven't seen any that warrant copyright suits).

* Greek Tattoo/Hellenic Stixis: Specializes in tattoos of Hellenic motifs -- akin to much of what I wear on my arms. Research in archaeology and ancient Greek arts inform the designs of the work done here, and so if you're looking to be adorned like a Greek vase, this is the place to go.

* Tattooligans: When traveling through northern Greece, in the great city of Thessaloniki (Salonika), head to Tattooligans for color realism, some of the best coming outta the country.

* Nico Tattoo CrewThe tattoo studios of Nico Tattoo -- found in Athens, Thessaloniki and Alexandroupoli -- have a lot of artists working there, some excellent and some still learning, but when I passed by the Athens shop, I had the freedom to browse all the portfolios at leisure and everyone was super friendly. Nico himself has been around awhile and is known as a top Greek artist, but I was also really diggin the work of Kostas at the Athens shop for Japanese and Eastern iconography.

* Jimmy's: Jimmy's is the oldest tattoo shop in Greece and I remember there was a time over a decade ago that it was the only shop I'd ever hear of when I asked people in Athens about their tattoos. To learn more about Jimmy's, read this fabulous article by Lars Krutak for the Vanishing Tattoo.

This isn't an exhaustive list of course, and there are many great Greek tattoo artists creating beautiful works of art throughout the country.
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