Results tagged “Connecticut”

May201131
03:23 PM
misfitsfront.jpeg
This Saturday, June 4th, Hope Gallery pays tribute The Misfits with "We are 138," a group show of 138 artists (largely tattooists) presenting 7x7 works inspired by the horror punk band. The opening, which starts at 7pm,  promises "famous monsters" along with food, drink, and pretty people. The exhibit runs until July 9th.

On Hope Gallery's Facebook page, there's a fun series of quick & dirty mini-interviews with participating artists, including Dan Smith whose painting and tattoo work is shown below. Here's a bit from that Q&A:

What song did you get for WE ARE 138?
Who Killed Marilyn?

How did you get inspired to paint your piece?
Marilyn Monroe has always been someone who I have been intrigued by so the inspiration to paint her came very quickly. She has such a timeless, unique profile so obviously mixing the fiend skull with one of Marilyn's countless sexy poses made a lot of sense to me.

What is the best Misfits Album?
Static Age was the first record I got, so naturally it will stay with me as being the most memorable. Its probably the most raw and fast Misfits record too.

What is your favorite Misfits lyric?
"I want your skull. I need your skull."

What is it about the Misfits that makes them so iconic?
I think the fact they were completely original in that time. There were other bands that captured that sound somewhat, but none that looked the way the misfits did. Everything image-wise made total sense, and the logo was the icing on the cake. Timeless and recognizable from across the room!
...
More on the "We are 138" show at HopeGalleryTattoo.com.

Dan Smith_Who Killed Marylin.jpegdan smith tattoo.jpg
Mar201117
04:00 PM
2011_skin_and_bones.jpgThis Saturday, March 19th, is the official opening of Skin and Bones: Tattoos in the Life of the American Sailor at the Mystic Seaport in Connecticut.

The traveling exhibit from Philadelphia's Independence Seaport Museum (which we first wrote about in April 2009) explores the connection between tattooing and maritime life:

Skin & Bones presents over two centuries of ancient and modern tattooing tools, flash, and tattoo-related art, historic photographs, and artifacts to tell the story of how tattoos entered the sailor's life, what they meant, and why they got them.
Nick Schonberger, consulting curator, says one of the highlights of this exhibit is the C.H. Fellowes book of flash, one of the oldest surviving American flash books. Also on view is Samuel O'Reilly's electric tattoo machine of 1891. Read more on the exhibit's other artifacts and programs here

Skin & Bones runs until September 5th. The museum is open daily from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

[As I noted in my initial post on the exhibit: If you're wondering what the pig and rooster on the feet mean, read the Tattoo Archive's article on the symbolism of sailor tattoos.]
1
connect with us
advertisement
archives
advertisement








EDITOR IN CHIEF:
Marisa Kakoulas
CONTRIBUTORS:
Miguel Collins
Craig Dershowitz
Brian Grosz
Sean Risley
Patrick Sullivan
© ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.
Needles and Sins powered by Moveable Type.

Site designed and programmed by Striplab.

NS logo designed by Viktor Koen.