Results tagged “Edgar Hoill”

May201519
07:05 AM
jack rudy.jpg
Photo of Jack Rudy above by Edgar Hoill.

Some interesting tattoo headlines over the past week, including international convention coverage, a tattoo idol interview, and a talk about the "tramp stamp." Here we go:

Starting off, in another great tattooer profile, the OC Weekly interviews Jack Rudy, legendary black & grey artist. In it, Jack offers some history on fine line tattooing, muses on his own start in tattooing, ponders Instagram trolls, and bemoans the popularity of tattoos in his own special way:

Tattoos weren't ever supposed to be this popular. I remember Don Ed Hardy used to say that he wanted tattoos to be more acceptable and respectable. At the time, it was a great idea, but looking back, I'd tell him to just let the sleeping dog lie," Rudy says. "When something becomes too popular, it loses its coolness. It's a good thing tattoos hurt, because otherwise, every pussy in the world would have one."
Read more of the Q&A here.

In Greece, the 9th Annual Athens Tattoo Convention took place this weekend, hosting over 230 artists worldwide, and garnered some international media attention in the process, including The Baltimore Sun and a more extensive slideshow on Citizenside. I've been following the show on Instagram to check some amazing tattoos created at the show, including this one below by Roza of Sake Tattoo Crew, which won "Best of Show Big."

GWTW tattoo.pngThe Liverpool Tattoo Convention also received media attention, including this article with slideshow.

Taking on the whole "tramp stamp" label, Chiara Gabriel talks about feminism, tattoos, and derogatory terms assigned to popular placement on women. While the title is unfortunate, "Don't Call it a Tramp Stamp: How the Patriarchy Ruined My Tattoo," she makes some great points on that special kind of tattoo discrimination reserved just for us ladies. Here's a taste:

I was only able to enjoy my LBT [lower back tattoo] for a few years before it became a complete and total joke. "Tattoo on the lower back?" asks Vince Vaughn's character in 2005's Wedding Crashers. "Might as well be a bullseye." Branded a whore. Must want sex. There's no equivalent phrase for men, no flip expression for the thing Nick Lachey has encircling his bicep even though it's equally emblematic of the early 2000s. It's so hard to come up with a name for bad man tattoos because it's so hard to demean men sexually and boy, do they get upset when you call them date rapists. Herpes early warning signal? Creep signature? American slang has failed me.
[...]
Recently, the tramp stamp has been joined by the skank flank, a term for a tattoo on the side of a women's ribcage--a similarly strategic choice of placement, with a similarly insulting name. If you are a woman, and you want to control who can see your tattoo, that still rankles people. If it's visible, you'll be judged, but if you're careful about keeping it from being too prominent, you'll be judged too. I haven't yet heard of a term for tattoos on women's stomachs, or thighs, but I'm sure that as a society we'll find clever rhyming slurs for those spots, too.
She's right. I've jokingly used these terms myself, but in light of the continual use of these type of terms, I realized that it's just not that funny. Glad to see these issue discussed in wider forums, and coming up on social newsfeeds.

Feel free to share your thoughts on this and other news items in our Facebook Group Page or Tweet at me.

May201322
07:24 AM
black and grey virgin mary.jpgPhoto by Edgar Hoil. Tattoo by Josh Lin.

Despite being covered in ornamental blackwork tattoos, I love all genres of the art, which is why it has been fun exploring them all in my books when I can't have them all on my bod.

One of the volumes from the Black & Grey Tattoo box set, focused on photo realism in tattooing, and on its pages were lush renderings of images, from pop culture portraits to wild animals to family tributes, and much more. There are so many ways to explore photorealism in tattooing, which makes it an exciting art form.

And when something is exciting, well, it usually ends up on TV.

The folks at Oxygen's tattoo competition show, Best Ink, have asked me to do a post on photorealism in light of tonight's episode, which pits the tattoo artist contestants against each other as they vie to create the best realistic drawings, and tattoos on clients who expect an artistic miracle in five hours.  You can catch a preview of the episode here.

insect tattoo by tim kern.jpg Insect tattoo by Tim Kern, Tribulation Tattoo.  

Realistic tattooing has not merely developed in in the past decade--it has mutated, leaping far beyond normal progression in its artistry and execution. There has been explosion of photographic representations tattooed with great precision and depth. It has invigorated the tattoo community with the possibilities of mastering a difficult art on a difficult canvas.

Both new and experienced artists face a number of challenges in realistic tattooing; the most obvious one is making it look real--capturing the look, and even the soul, of the subject. Many portrait tattoos, for example, commemorate the loves of the wearer: family, pets, cars and even fictional characters. The personal significance prescribed to these tattoos adds to the great responsibility of the artist.  Another challenge concerns the longevity of the tattoo. A skilled tattooist may choose not to render certain details in the tattoo exactly as they appear in the photo because, as skin ages, lines blur and ink fades, which could leave a portrait of Marilyn Monroe looking more like Marilyn Manson. Realism specialists also find ways to create a harmony with the body so that the tattoos don't look "slapped on" but appear organic to the wearer. It's particularly difficult to have this balance and stay true to the image but stellar artists find the right mix.

Beyonce Tattoo.jpg
Beyonce portrait tattoo on Karolina by Andre Tenorio.

Keeping all this in mind, it will be interesting to see if the contestants on Best Ink do justice to the genre and come up with work that demonstrates the true artistry and exciting possibilities of photorealistic tattooing. The show airs at 10 PM EST ... and yes, we'll be drinking.
Nov201117
05:40 PM
Latino Art.jpg

An inspiring collection of 250 illustrations created by 90 tattooists fill the 300-page hardcover Latino Art Collection: Tattoo-Inspired Chicano, Maya, Aztec and Mexican Styles, another tattoo tome published by Edition Reuss and authored by Edgar Hoill, aka OSOK. [Edgar & I co-authored Black & Grey Tattoo last year.]

The renowned artists, from LA to Mexico City to Hong Kong, include Jack Rudy, Chuey Quintanar, Carlos Torres, Nikko Hurtado, Pint, Indio & Melissa Reyes, Boog Brown, Wa-Wang, Tim Hendricks, Antonio Mejia, Goethe, Luke Wessman, Dr. Lakra, Yushi Takei, Pedro Alvarez (who did the cover art), and so many more.

You can purchase the book for $160 + shipping here.

I was honored to write the introduction and the pages noting the various symbolism in the works. For an overview of the book, an excerpt from that introduction is reprinted below:

carlos torres painting.jpg Painting by Carlos Torres.

Latino art is as vast and diverse as the cultures it represents. There are, however, popular themes, aesthetics and symbolism that make it an identifiable artistic genre--one that is vibrant and exciting, and reaching far beyond just the Latino community. Latino artists celebrate their cultural identity in contemporary culture as well as their ancient Prehispanic roots. Catholicism's religious iconography dominates so much of this art, whether it be on canvas, walls, cars or the human body. Personal struggles and the hardships of street life are laid bare; it is, for many, a cathartic expression of loss and redemption. And, of course, reverence for beauty and sexuality is omnipresent. This book is a collection of paintings, drawings, and tattoo flash that represents the soulfulness of this genre. Its goal is to present the many incarnations of Latino, Chicano, and Mexican art and to inspire countless other works.

Most of the artists featured are tattooists, and it's particularly interesting to see how their tattoo styles translate in their fine art. For example, black & grey tattoo motifs--from manifestations of Mi Vida Loca to sexy cholas--are prevalent and even composed in similar shadows and tones as works displayed on skin. There are also interesting cultural fusions where traditional Americana technique, with its thick black outlines and bold colors, is used to convey traditional Mexican and Chicano imagery like sugar skulls and Aztec gods.
boog art.jpgIllustration by Boog Brown.

In addition to the book, also check Egar's OSOK online store for his prints and apparel.
Feb201102
04:05 PM
laura by edgar hoill.jpg
This Saturday, February 5th, Lowrider Arte editor and photographer Edgar Hoill will be showing his notorious street portraits and celebrating the launch of his new clothing line One Shot One Kill [OSOK] at the Smoking Mirrors Gallery in Pomona, California. And of course there will be a car show as expected of a member of the Lowrider family.

I introduced myself to Edgar two years ago at the London Tattoo Convention after seeing his series of work that focused on tattoo culture, including the photo above of Parisian tattooist Laura Satana and LA's black & grey prodigy Jesus "Chuey" Quintanar (shown below with two clients). After a couple of tequilas, we decided to collaborate on a book project, but unlike many alcohol-fueled plans, this one actually came to fruition. A year later, the Black & Grey Tattoo box set was born. [Edgar is selling his signed copies of Black & Grey Tattoo as well as prints at the event.]

See more of Edgar's photography here and visit the OSOK clothing store online here.

Smoking Mirrors Gallery
565 W. 2nd St. #5
Pomona, CA 91766
Opening from 6-11PM

chuey quintanar tattoo.jpgI still have a limited number of my own author copies of Black & Grey Tattoo for $350. Email me at marisa [at] needlesandsins.com for more details.
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