Results tagged “Into You Tattoo”

Nov201326
09:19 AM
mr-x-poster.jpgIn this intense and beautiful short film on Duncan X, of Into You Tattoo in London, director Alex Nicholson could have just let Duncan talk of his struggles, his drug use, his son, his beliefs and approach to tattooing, and his fascination with it all. Duncan's words alone are moving; however, this film is made even more powerful by Nicholson's collaboration with MPC's Motion Design Studio, in which Duncan's own tattoos come to life on his body as he shares his personal stories. The animation is also used to punctuate dark moments -- black tears for a tragic memory, and dark smoke floating from his mouth as he speaks of heroin. Despite the heaviness, there's also something very heartening, as is often the case when one speaks of the love for tattoos.

The process of how those tattoos materialize in the film is interesting in itself.  As described by MPC, Duncan's body was covered in make-up and tracker markers to determine their placement.  "The tattoos were animated and then tracked onto his body using Mocha. RealFlow was also utilized to create the flowing effects, and the snakes were animated in Cinema 4D." For all the techie details, read VFX Supervisor John Sunter's explanation of his process on MPC's site.

For more on Duncan X's work, check his online portfolio, and also Into You's site. Also, my most favorite tattoo flash sheets in my possession have been created by Duncan. Check them here.
 Duncan X.jpg
Oct201328
08:36 AM
KINTARO_Daisuke_Sakaguchi.jpg
Into_You_Wall3.jpgPhotos above and the portrait of Daisuke Sakaguchi below by Nick Delaney.

On view at London's iconic tattoo studio and art gallery, Into You, are fantastic new works by Daisuke Sakaguchi, from canvas paintings to skateboards, and also collaboration pieces, such as jewelry with The Great Frog; artful sex toys with Illicit Touch; and a gorgeous vintage Yamaha motorcycle with Black Skulls. It's an incredibly diverse collection, but with all pieces imbued with Sakaguchi's evident passion for Irezumi, traditional Japanese tattooing, and Ukiyo-e, a genre of Japanese woodblock prints. The show closes this Thursday, October 21st, so head to Into You, from 12pm - 7pm, and don't miss it.

It's wonderful that an esteemed artist has teemed up with an esteemed tattoo studio, making his work accessible to all, especially as his art has been shown in quite exclusive venues. Just last year, Sakaguchi's stunning hand painted transformation of the 1935 BT Phone Box was auctioned at The National Portrait Gallery by Sotheby's, followed by his one off "Chikara" bicycle helmet being showcased and sold at the Legacy List 2012 exhibition at the Sotheby's London Gallery. He also created a collection of hand-painted limited edition Faberge African Ostrich eggs for Selfridges London.

Daisuke_Sakaguchi_eggs.jpgPhoto above by Nicola Saint-Marc.

Currently, Sakaguchi is learning to tattoo by master artist Alex "Horikitsune" Reinke, who has created stunning tattoos on Sakaguchi. I asked the artist about his tattoos and tattooing. Here's a bit from our chat:

Are you heavily involved in the design process of your tattoos?

In regards to me being a customer, I put forward the motifs that I would like along with the essence that I would like it to convey. However I give Alex the freedom to layout the placements and the composition. He knows best. As an artist and designer myself, I totally appreciate that a creative person needs the space and opportunity to execute the best work possible.

Have you ever been asked to design tattoos for another?

Yes, I have designed some small tattoos for friends of mine. I enjoy designing tattoos as well as creating paintings that are an expression on tattoo imagery. These are some of the reasons why I am very passionate about continuing to learn about the art of tattooing itself.

Daisuke_Sakaguchi.jpg As you've said, there is that strong influence of Irezumi and Ukiyo-e in your work. What was it particularly about these arts that drew you in?

As a Japanese man born and brought up in London, I had two upbringings. At home, both of my parents spoke to me in Japanese. At school, I spoke English. I learnt both English and Japanese cultures simultaneously. I am a fan of all kinds of traditional, modern, conceptual and visual art. It is Japanese art that I saw was so relevant to my blood line and ancestors from a symbolic perspective. It was also something that I was just naturally drawn to purely for it's beautiful aesthetics.

The more I looked at it, the more I wanted to research what all the motifs and stories meant and to see how I can incorporate these messages in to my own paintings and visual art work.
...

In addition to tattooing, Sakaguchi has some exciting upcoming projects: His friend, Wendy Meakin, the art collector and dealer, has recently purchased a vintage 1940 UK Test Bomb, and he will be painting on to the bomb to give it a brand new life. He says, "We love the idea of taking something that is a symbol of destruction and creating a new positive purpose for it. It will become a powerful peaceful statement piece. The test bomb will be reborn as the "Love Bomb"!"  Sakaguchi will also be collaborating with Steven Marlow to create a custom built and hand painted guitar.

If you can't make it to London to check Daisuke Sakaguchi's exhibit at Into You, you can get a taste from this 3-minute video (below), by Rino Pucci, of the opening.

Black, white and red / Daisuke Sakaguchi -- by Rino Pucci from Rino Pucci on Vimeo.

Jul201323
09:28 AM
curly moore tattoo.jpgCurly Moore Tattoo 2.jpg

Here's a spotlight on another artist featured in my upcoming Black Tattoo Art II book: blackwork legend Andreas Curly Moore, who works in Oxford at the Tattoo Club of Great Britain.

Curly was raised in the City of Oxford, close to the Pitt Rivers Museum -- a place that houses one of the most comprehensive ethnographic collections in the world, including Maori art, which has had a strong influence on Curly's tattoo work.  He began tattooing in 1993, after drawing several designs that he wanted tattooed upon himself, and soon, several of his friends were asking him to tattoo them as well. Curly then met Alex Binnie of Into You Tattoo in London, and for six years, was part of the most renowned contemporary blackwork specialist crews in the world.

According to Curly, "at the dawn of the New Millennium, it was time for a change," and so he returned to Oxford and is now working at the Tattoo Club of Great Britain's studio in the Cowley Road, Oxford. Curly says that the change has given him an opportunity to do more varied styles of work, including more traditional tattoos, but he's still rockin the NeoTribal and Abstract work for which he has been long admired.

Check more of Curly's work on Facebook, and in Black Tattoo Art II when it drops in September. 
May200921
12:00 AM
noon chest tattoo.jpg Good readers, let me take this time to suggest you toss out that old tape recorder from the 80s you may have used to interview various tattoo artists in the past, especially if you've recently discovered that during your latest interview it failed to record anything at all and, instead, still has the four gloriously terrible songs from your short-lived lark of a synth-heavy goofball hardcore band AXXX WOUND.

Good thing I was able to hang out with French tattooer Noon for a few weeks before getting him to sit down for an interview. So instead of a nice and neat little Q and A, you get a nice and neat little quasi-article from some feverishly taken notes before Noon booked for more international travels. And while it seems Noon is constantly on the move, he's made a semi-permanent home at Tattoo Culture in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, usually returning twice a year.

Recently featured in the May issue of Total Tattoo, Noon has created a style instantly recognizable and completely his own. It's something I'd rather let him describe, though he plainly says, "It's difficult to explain. I would say it's minimalist, it's singular. I don't know if there's a real name for this. The way I started was with the idea that the tattoo could be finished with only the line."

noon_tattoo.jpg

Growing up in a town full of ex-cons and gypsies, Noon's studied how they tattooed. "I watched them attach needles to pencils and set the ink bottle on a small plate over a flame. Very basic. I was young and in the poor part of town. All the guys there were tattooed and tattooing all the time. So I watched them. And at ten years old, I already knew how they did it. There was no color, no fill, only the line."

Noon's gypsy education could only go so far. He retained the basics and began to learn himself. He explains, "There were no magazines, no Internet. So in 1996 I got the address of Mickey Sharpz in London and I bought everything I could! I practiced on myself, I was always on the phone with Lionel (from Out of Step Tattoo) and we'd go back and forth asking 'How do you do this?' 'What's working for you?' It was not so easy then."

"I like the look and feel," he says, making motions with his hands that seem to be building something in mid-air. He plans to keep painting but he is a tattooist first. "Always tattooing," he says, "until they shkkt! -- chop off my hands."

Noon will be back at Tattoo Culture from November 9th through the 22nd. He's currently taking appointments via email.
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Marisa Kakoulas
CONTRIBUTORS:
Miguel Collins
Craig Dershowitz
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