Results tagged “Jack Rudy”

Mar201426
09:42 AM


Featuring some of black & grey's finest, "Tattoo Stories" is a video series by Estevan Oriol and Mister Cartoon, with the goal of exploring the work, and personal lives, of esteemed tattooers from an insider's perspective -- and not just the usual "How long have you been tattooing?" Q & As.

The videos, which average around 6-7 minutes, take you into the studios of legends such a Jack Rudy and Rick Walter's, who offer tattoo history as well as philosophy lessons. There are also interviews with some of the most exceptional tattooers today, including Shawn Barber, Chuey Quintanar, Carlos Torres, Luke Wessman, Franco Vescovi, and many others.   

The series launched last summer, and when I first checked their SanctionedTV YouTube page at that time, I thought it was largely focused on their "LA Woman" series. As we stay away from the "tattoo model" thing, I didn't share it.  And so it was a happy surprise to go back and see that so much important tattoo footage, and not just T&A, had been amassed and offered in an engaging way.

Oh, and there's also this really moving Snoop Dog (yes, Snoop Dog) vid.
Nov201211
09:38 AM
BobTyrrellTattooGiveaway_Body.pngOur friends at Sullen Clothing have yet another tattoo giveaway, and this time you can enter to win a free tattoo from ... Bob Tyrrell [exclamation points].

The winner of the contest will be flown to Detroit Rock City to be tattooed by Bob at the Motor City Tattoo Convention. The Motor City show is one of the stops on the Inked Up World Tour, which is a kickass partnership between Sullen and Rockstar Energy Drink.  The tour kicks off early 2013 and will have 12 of some the best artists in the world -- no really, the best -- hit up 12 international tattoo conventions. 

Check the video below with a South Park-ized Bob throwing out the details -- the best part of the video is that Jack Rudy is doing the voice of Bob. Gotta see it.

Also check out the new Bob Tyrrell tee for Sullen.
 
Nov201117
05:40 PM
Latino Art.jpg

An inspiring collection of 250 illustrations created by 90 tattooists fill the 300-page hardcover Latino Art Collection: Tattoo-Inspired Chicano, Maya, Aztec and Mexican Styles, another tattoo tome published by Edition Reuss and authored by Edgar Hoill, aka OSOK. [Edgar & I co-authored Black & Grey Tattoo last year.]

The renowned artists, from LA to Mexico City to Hong Kong, include Jack Rudy, Chuey Quintanar, Carlos Torres, Nikko Hurtado, Pint, Indio & Melissa Reyes, Boog Brown, Wa-Wang, Tim Hendricks, Antonio Mejia, Goethe, Luke Wessman, Dr. Lakra, Yushi Takei, Pedro Alvarez (who did the cover art), and so many more.

You can purchase the book for $160 + shipping here.

I was honored to write the introduction and the pages noting the various symbolism in the works. For an overview of the book, an excerpt from that introduction is reprinted below:

carlos torres painting.jpg Painting by Carlos Torres.

Latino art is as vast and diverse as the cultures it represents. There are, however, popular themes, aesthetics and symbolism that make it an identifiable artistic genre--one that is vibrant and exciting, and reaching far beyond just the Latino community. Latino artists celebrate their cultural identity in contemporary culture as well as their ancient Prehispanic roots. Catholicism's religious iconography dominates so much of this art, whether it be on canvas, walls, cars or the human body. Personal struggles and the hardships of street life are laid bare; it is, for many, a cathartic expression of loss and redemption. And, of course, reverence for beauty and sexuality is omnipresent. This book is a collection of paintings, drawings, and tattoo flash that represents the soulfulness of this genre. Its goal is to present the many incarnations of Latino, Chicano, and Mexican art and to inspire countless other works.

Most of the artists featured are tattooists, and it's particularly interesting to see how their tattoo styles translate in their fine art. For example, black & grey tattoo motifs--from manifestations of Mi Vida Loca to sexy cholas--are prevalent and even composed in similar shadows and tones as works displayed on skin. There are also interesting cultural fusions where traditional Americana technique, with its thick black outlines and bold colors, is used to convey traditional Mexican and Chicano imagery like sugar skulls and Aztec gods.
boog art.jpgIllustration by Boog Brown.

In addition to the book, also check Egar's OSOK online store for his prints and apparel.
Mar201122
04:40 PM
jackrudy sullen.jpgUPDATE: And we have a winner! Two actually. Emails from George Koutroubis and Sean Phillips dinged in almost immediately after posting so George will get the tee and Sean will get a signed Jack Rudy-designed poster. Thanks to all of y'all who played along. The special promo code for Sullen discounts is still in effect.

The name "Sullen" has long been identifiable with tattooing and not for its artists' sunny dispositions. The lifestyle brand, Sullen Clothing, has been partnering with top tattooists (as well as graffiti artists and painters) to bring their art to apparel, prints, and other media. The Sullen Art Collective line includes original designs from Bob Tyrrell, Shawn Barber, Nikko Hurtado, Steve Soto, Jason Butcher, and many other well respected names. And soon, it will feature the work of black & grey legend Jack Rudy.

While Sullen and Jack have worked together on shirts, prints, posters and promos many times before -- including Tattooland's 35th anniversary tee -- this latest project is Jack's first Signature Tee with the Sullen Art Collective. The shirt will be officially released the first week of April but we have one here ready to giveaway to one lucky reader.

TO WIN:  Send me an email to marisa at needlesandsins.com with the name of the car club Jack co-founded. [Hint: the answer can be found in N+S archives.] The first person to do so wins the tee. Easy.
 
We also have a special promo code for 15% off any purchase on BuySullen.com. Just add "NEEDLESANDSINS" upon checkout for the discount.

Good luck!

TS_Jack_Rudy_blk.jpg
[Photo of Jack Rudy by Nicole Caldwell.]
Feb201111
11:18 AM
wp tattoo graphic.jpg
It's official. On Tuesday, The Washington Post declared tattoos "mainstream," thereby negating all the hard-earned street cred we've so desperately fought for.

Ok, it's not so bad.

Of course it starts out with the old wrong-side-of-the-tracks and sailor references that we read in almost every "mainstream" article on tattooing, but then it gets a bit meatier. The reporter had gone to the DC Tattoo Expo last month and talked with some tattoo veterans including Tramp Welker, Chuck Eldridge, Mary Skiver, and Jack Rudy, among others. I particularly love Mary's quote when discussing her clientele, the majority of which are 40- to 80-year-old women: "They've raised their kids and their kids' kids, and now they're ready to be themselves." And Jack weighed in on those trying to cash in on the art:

"I never would've believed that there would one day be these tattoo shop owners with no tattoos," said Jack Rudy of Los Angeles, one of the pioneers of a style called fine-line black and gray. "They just think of themselves as some sort of entrepreneur, and even though that's true, this business is so personal to us that are in it. That's like a vegan owning a steakhouse. It's not against the law, but why would you even want to own a steakhouse if you're only going to eat the steamed vegetables? But people don't think twice about owning a tattoo shop and not having any tattoos. They think of it as the same thing as a doughnut or dry cleaning franchise."
The article has just a few photos from the DC show but also includes some interesting info graphics like the one above. They're creative -- not 100% accurate -- but worth a peak.

Thanks, JD, for the link!
Aug201030
03:40 PM



Recently we've been talking about tattoos in marketing like Yahoo's latest ad. Well, the fun continues with these TV spots for Mountain Dew and Virgin Mobile featuring the legendary Jack Rudy. I'm not really getting the Mountain Dew connection--it's a stretch--but at least the faux tattoo work isn't bad.

Thanks to our media guru Ron Worthy for the links.

Jul201026
10:28 AM
jack rudy.jpg
It's not easy setting up an interview with a tattoo legend who doesn't need any press and has no time for your shit. [Or at least my shit.] Thankfully, the Godfather of Black & Grey tattoo, Jack 'From Way Back' Rudy of Good Time Charlie's Tattooland still does a lot of conventions, and I was able to stalk him sufficiently--with the help of Edgar Hoill--to get his thoughts on everything from single-needle tattooing to kustom kars.

That interview is in this latest issue of Inked magazine, which you can pick up at newsstands or download from Zinio.

Here are a few snippets from our talk:

As one of the godfathers of Black & Gray tattooing, you're the best person to educate people on the basics. First, please describe the black & gray style.

It's something that has evolved over the years. Originally, when Charlie [Good Time Charlie Cartwright] and I started doing it, we called it "Black & White" like the photography, but then realized--with skin tones being different and so forth--that "Black & Gray" was more accurate to what we were doing because it was, ya know, from solid black to every shade of gray imaginable. It originally was a California prison style that we adopted. Being the first ones to do it in a shop, it just started out with very humble beginnings and has evolved into what it is today. It's a style with obviously no color, using solid black to the lightest shade of gray and everything in between with a person's own skin as contrast. It's actually a difficult style to master; a lot of people try to do it, and many people can do it well, but there are a lot of people who can't.

[...]

What do you think are the elements of a good tattoo, black & gray or otherwise?

I think that contrast is always an important factor; you know, sometimes using a dark background to make something light stand out. There are a lot of different aspects that make a tattoo good, regardless of what style it is: good line work, good shading, solid color (if that's what you're doing). It's more than just a good design; it's placement, it's the structure of it, where it's at...Can you tell what it is? Do you have to get right up on it? Because some miniature fine line stuff you got to get right up on it to tell what it is while other things you can read from across the room. Or if you're trying to do tribal, you want it as solid as possible. Does it move with the body? Does it go with that part of the body? There are so many factors that make a good tattoo good.


jack rudy tattoo.jpg
Beyond tattooing, you also have a passion for classic cars and hot rods,and co-founded The Beatniks car club where many of its members are tattoo artists and collectors. What's the connection between tattoo art and customizing 50s styled cars and rods?

Hmmm, for the Beatniks, this is a club that is 18-years-old and counting, and all of the members are very heavily tattooed. There are a lot of tattoo artists in the club as well, but it's not exclusive to tattoo artists by any means. All of the Beatniks share a love for tattoos and tattoo art. There are quite a few artists in the club as well who are not tattooers.For us, it's just part of the deal. There are a lot of people that are into old hot rods and customs who are not tattooed and don't have any desire to get any. For us, it's just always been part of the whole lifestyle--it's a little different for us. With most of us as artists, that talent shows in our kars, in our kustoms and hot rods as well.

Read more in the August issue of Inked.

Jun201016
02:55 PM
zombie tim kern.jpgIn working on my upcoming Black & Grey Tattoo book, I came across rockin realism in the form of tattoo artist portraits, including Paul Booth, Bob Tyrrell, Jack Rudy, Tim Kern (above), and other greats. And so I had to learn more about the man who pays tribute to these artists with his own skin. Here's the story of Broken from the UK:   

Please tell me about your tattoos and who did them.

I have some horror-inspired tattoos from different artists in the 80s/early 90s. But, about 10 years ago, thanks to the internet and increased number of tattoo magazines, my passion for tattoos was re-awakened. Paul Booth and Bob Tyrrell were top of the list, although I never thought for one moment I would ever be tattooed by them. Then in 2005, London started with a new tattoo convention and the following year, I decided to take a chance and email Bob Tyrrell. I knew I wanted a portrait tattoo and horror movie stars were the obvious choice for me, but having seen so many, I wanted something more unique. Then it hit me. Tattoo artists! These guys were creating masterpieces and yet tattooing was still seen as something only criminals, bikers and the lower end of society would get.

paul booth tattoo.jpgSo, as Paul Booth was top of my list, I asked Bob to do a portrait of him [shown right]. Ten minutes later, I got a reply and it was all set for the London Convention. It was also very important to me to have Bob tattoo the Paul Booth portrait because they are close friends. With all my portrait tattoos, I have the same philosophy. I think that a close bond with the subject they are tattooing makes for a more personal and unique tattoo. [Also at that convention I met Tim Kern and got a severed wrist tattoo.]

The following month I had decided on getting a tattoo sleeve of tattoo artist portraits. I met Bob in New York and he was more than happy with the artists I had in mind. So, over the next few years, I got portraits of Filip Leu, Jack Rudy and Robert Hernandez, from Bob. Before the Hernandez portrait, I needed to find a suitable artist to tattoo a portrait of Bob. The obvious choice was Robert Hernandez. He was very happy to do it and he ended up doing it at the London Convention 2008, with Bob watching.

Very interesting experience.
He told me he was honored to be part of my project. The following year at the convention, Bob tattooed the portrait of Robert on, with Robert watching. Again, it was a surreal experience, but that made it even more special.

[In between the portraits, another artist who I was desperate to get a tattoo from, was Milosch. His black and grey is amongst the best in the world. In 2008, I planned to set up an appointment with him in the Czech Republic. After emailing him, he told me was doing a convention in the UK and a guest spot at a studio beforehand. When I found out the studio was 20 minutes from my house, I knew it was fate. He created an amazing demon on my calf and we have become good friends.]
 

ben moss zombie.jpgTim Kern and Benjamin Moss [shown left] were next on my list, but I felt that these artists would be better suited to doing a self portrait. I had already met them both and they are extremely friendly and gracious people. When I asked them, they were more than happy to do it. I wanted them to do a more horror inspired portrait and they both came up with something amazing.


What has been the reaction by the tattooists to your requests?


When I asked Bob Tyrrell to do the Paul Booth portrait, he told me that he would get Paul to pose for the photo reference. I've met Paul a couple of times since and he is genuinely honored by it. In fact, all the portraits I've had done, have been specifically photographed for each one. I haven't met Jack Rudy yet, but Filip thought his was really cool when I showed him and all the others say it's an honor to be a part of it too.


Why tributes to tattooists?

I chose tattooists because, since getting back into tattoos about 10 years ago (after 10 years when I didn't get anything), I realized just how far tattooers had come as artists. Nowadays, so many tattooers also work in fine art. People like Paul Booth, Robert Hernandez, Jeff Gogue and Carlos Torres etc...could easily have a career as fine artists. Yet, many people still don't see tattooing as an art. So this is just my small way of showing my appreciation for such an under appreciated art form.


Your portraits are largely in black & grey--what do you love about this style?
 
Black and grey, to me, is a timeless medium. Just like b&g photographs, they have an aura about them that just says class. I also think there is more focus on the subject with b&g. With color, there is the option of moving with each color. Black and grey needs more self awareness.


See more of Broken's tattooist portraits here.
Sep200917
06:49 PM
freddy negrete tattoo.jpgTonight, at 9PM EST, is the third episode of Marked on the History Channel, a show that seeks to reveal the dark underbelly of tattoos.

Tonight, they look at Chicano style tattooing. The black & grey stylings that rose from the LA streets and prisons, and have been refined by tattoo legends like Good Time Charlie Cartwright, Jack Rudy, Brian Everett, and Freddy Negrete (whose work is shown right).

In fact, Negrete is featured in tonight's episode. Here's what director Robert Palumbo says about it:

"Artist Freddy Negrete, one of the originators of the Chicano style, takes viewers on an exclusive journey, deep into this unknown world where we decode the ink that decorates the bodies of current and former Chicano gangbangers."

For the full schedule of Marked episodes, check the History channel site.  
Aug200928
04:10 PM
jd larish.jpgHas it really been over a month since we last objectified tattooed men?

Forgive me. I've been so preoccupied with my upcoming book (and my own hot tattooed man) that I've neglected your one-handed typing needs. Well, I'm making up for it by objectifying one who is not only beautiful but beautifully tattooed by a roster of artists that is a Who's Who of the world's best, from Jack Rudy to Bugs to Brad Fink and beyond.  

Behold Jeffrey Larish:

* City: Tucson, AZ ... by way of DC, Chattanooga, TN, Charlotte, NC, Bethlehem, PA

* Age: 38

* Relationship status: Married with a beautiful daughter

* Work: Stay at Home Dad (although we rarely seem to actually be at home)

* Fun: Sometimes I like to play the Rock and/or Roll. Mostly I enjoy hanging with wife & kid.

* Movies: I like to watch the old Universal Monster Movies with my daughter.  We also watch the (real) Star Wars trilogy.

* Music: Yes, please!

* The Tattoos: I have tattoos from Rodney Raines & Chris Stuart of Ace Custom Tattoo, NC; Jack Rudy of Good Time Charlie's Tattooland, CA; Bugs of Tattoo Lounge, CA; Steve Lemak of The Quillian, PA; Curtis Richter of Art & Soul, PA; Chad Koeplinger (now at NY Adorned); Nikki Balls (now at Top Shelf Tattoo in Queens, NY); Matt Knopp of Tattoo Paradise, DC & MD; Steve Boltz & Eli Quinters of Smith Street Tattoo, Brooklyn; Jay Cavna of Sanctity Tattoo, AZ; Brad Fink of Iron Age Tattoo, St. Louis; Nick Colella of Chicago Tattoo Co.; with plans for more.

"When I first got tattooed way back in 1992, all I wanted was one little tattoo on my shoulder.  Over 17 years and 200 plus hours later, I'm just working on one really big tattoo."

If you'd like to be objectified, send your photo and stats to marisa at needlesandsins dotcom.

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EDITOR IN CHIEF:
Marisa Kakoulas
CONTRIBUTORS:
Miguel Collins
Craig Dershowitz
Brian Grosz
Sean Risley
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