Results tagged “Jondix”

Apr201309
08:58 AM
jondix art.jpgjondix art3.jpgIn Los Angeles this Saturday at the Against the Stream Buddhist Meditation Society, the first print installation by Raking Light Projects will take place featuring the work of tattooer, musician and visual artist Jondix of Barcelona, Spain.

I've been a long-time fan of Jondix's work -- a remarkable portfolio of intricate dotwork & blackwork, an example of which I've shown below.  In his tattoos, you'll find his own interpretation of Eastern iconography and patterns -- and his spiritual and mystical influences are ever present in this exhibit as well.

Entitled Aeons Tulpa, this print and sculpture installation is inspired by Jondix's extensive travels and is described as "a metaphysical exploration of the artist's interior world." Here's more from Raking Light Projects:  

The installation configuration, influenced by cosmology, represents Jondix's metaphysical being. Nine prints are arranged in rows and columns of three to create the shape of a square, with the tenth print displayed off to the side. Central to the installation is the idea of energy and connection, where each of the ten laser-etched prints are not only physically connected by string but also spiritually connected to the artist. The iconography is a confluence of motifs with Jondix's signature mystical imagery and Eastern-influenced patterning. His visual lexicon borrows from Eastern philosophies and incorporates auspicious symbols, deities and ritualistic objects combined with allusions to personal fantasy and science fiction.
Jondix offers his own thoughts on his process for the show:

When you go into deep meditation, Vipassana or transcendental, you enter all the hidden parts of your mind. . . your body secretes endogenously produced drugs and you can have visions. When I was creating this series, I put myself in that position--trying to create something that will come to my mind in the future--and serendipitously I found my favorite place.
Aeons Tulpa will be on view at the Against the Stream gallery for a year. Saturday's opening will take place from 7pm-10pm.

For more on Raking Light Projects, and their art prints created by renowned tattooists, check our post on them here.

Jondix tattoo.jpg
Mar201230
02:21 PM
TimothyHoyerLiberation.jpgArtwork by Timothy Hoyer

Over the years, when interviewing renowned tattooists about the greatest influences on their work, the name Eddy Deutsche is constantly being dropped. As part of the first crew of artists at Ed Hardy's legendary Tattoo City and later working with Horitaku of the Horitoshi family, Eddy developed a style that has inspired other artists to go beyond traditional tattoo tenets and experiment in their compositions and techniques, to meld various artistic influences and create unique works of tattoo art. 

Eddy is a consummate innovator, and his latest project, featuring the fine art of tattooists, is another exciting example of this:  Raking Light Projects is an online art gallery featuring fine arts and collectible prints created by stellar tattoo artists. With co-owner Andrew Fingerhut, Eddy invites a select group of artists to create a work of fine art based on their interpretation of a theme, along with several single-edition prints to showcase their individual artistic style and creative perspective. The work is then made available for viewing and purchase exclusively on RakingLightProjects.com.

The first theme is "Liberation," interpreted by Guy Aitchison, Jondix, Timothy Hoyer, Bert Krak, Carlos Rodriguez and Derrick Snodgrass. It's fascinating to see the vastly different approaches to the theme. Andrew offers more on this:

The overall collection successfully showcases the diverse perspective and the true depth of talent found among a select group of working tattooists.  Some art proudly reflects the expressive, bold elements long associated with the best tattoo work.  Other work reveals alternative facets of creativity that are as uniquely suited to paper and canvas composition as they are distinct from ink on skin.  The tattoo commonality among participating artists can be celebrated, critiqued or ignored because the body of work stands strongly on its own.   

Andrew also explained more about the process:

A variety of traditional and digital printmaking techniques were utilized to create the prints.  Each participating artist created original artwork that served as source material for a single edition of 20 or 25 prints.  Once the prints were produced, the original artwork was destroyed or cancelled to preserve the underlying value of the edition and to ensure that the prints are objectively considered limited edition works of art.  All prints are signed, numbered and include an artist-verified Certificate of Authenticity.  Each artist was closely involved in the printmaking production process and their time, attention to detail and effort is proudly reflected in the resulting artwork.
 
I can personally attest to the print quality, having a hand-signed mixed media print on canvas of Timothy Hoyer's "Void," which hangs near my desk as I write this. As noted on the Raking Light site, it is giclee on gallery-wrapped canvas with silk-screen overlay; printed on Lyve fine art canvas using Epson archival pigmented inks; coating applied and pulled by hand on silk-screen machine using Glamour II varnish. The result is a powerful piece that is worth much more than its $250 price.

To view all available works, check the Raking Light gallery.

TimLehiKindaBattleRoyale.jpgTim Lehi laser etched wood print (above).


JondixHolyMountain.jpgMixed media print by Jondix.

Feb201109
01:29 PM
Tattoo Flyer.jpgBased on the flood of emails we've been getting over this exhibit, it seems London's art circles are amped over the upcoming Pens and Needles show at the London Miles Gallery, opening Friday, February 25th. 

Pens and Needles will feature original paintings, stencils and photographs from over 20 highly respected tattoo artists, including Shawn Barber, Claudia Sabe, Nick Baxter, Nick Colella, Alex Binnie, Mike Davis, Xam, Daniel Albrigo, Holy Fox, Jeff Gogue, Shad, Jondix, Jee Sayalero, Lea Nahon, among many others.

More information on the show can be found here. I particularly like this part of the exhibit description: 

Attitudes towards tattoo art and tattooed individuals continue to evolve for the better. Nowadays, it's getting harder and harder to draw a distinction between fine art and the best of modern tattooing. Doesn't this then make tattooed individuals the new cultural ambassadors of a truly new and distinctive 'modern art'?

Much of today's contemporary and fine art isn't too disparate from that which tattoo artists are creating on skin. Much like their painterly peers, the most accomplished and skilled of tattoo artists assign the same exacting precision to composition, tone, perspective, and conceptual design when producing their own inimitable works of art.
Just call me Cultural Ambassador Kakoulas! 

The opening will also feature live music and live tattooing in their pop-up tattoo parlour. The party runs from from 7 to 11pm. And all are welcome to show off their own body of art. 
Jul200913
11:31 PM
jondix tattoo.jpgTons of tattoo stories topped the headlines, and I've trolled through them all to bring ya the good, bad and the whatthefuck.

N+S keeps our focus on stellar tattoo art, like this fresh work from Jondix in Spain (who's part of my upcoming Black Tattoo Art book); however, we will on occasion link to examples of the WTF if only to feel a sense of unbridled tattoo superiority. And so, behold COED Mag's What Were They Thinking gallery.

Many of the tattoos shown are featured the book No Regrets: The Best, Worst, & Most #$%*ing Ridiculous Tattoos Ever but there are some new gems like the Hasselhoff Ode and Chris Farley memorial tattoo. Looking at them, I feel better about myself already. And that is the power of tattoo. [Thanks, Father Panik, for the boobies COED tattoo link.]

UFC's Alan Belcher did not make the WTF list with his deformed Johnny Cash portrait tattoo.


As for the bad ...


I really don't know what's worse: Canada's CTA excessive use of  "tramp stamp" in a removal story (and quoting a doc who says women can't get epidurals because of them -- not true) or starting off the article with reference to some shmuck who wanted a corkscrew tattoo removed from his penis. CTA did get the title right though -- Laser treatment is not quick fix. For stupid.

Then there's this going-to hell-bad: Texas Man Sought for Unpaid Bill for God Tattoo.


And the badass...


yakuza tattoo.jpgBurn Magazine's Eye of the Beholder story/photo by Anton Kusters who is documenting a Yakuza family in Kabukicho, Japan. One of our faves, Susanah Breslin, has been guest blogging for Boing Boing and included this powerful image in her collection of wondrous things.

This one is pretty wondrous to me ... "Man resurrects friend's ashes into tattoo." Granted, this isn't the first time I've heard stories like this but I always get goosebumps at the thought of actually wearing a loved one in my skin. I think it's a beautiful tribute but I wonder if anything else gets carried over in the ash. Just sayin.

In good news ...


Reuters reports that there are less Iraqis getting tattoos used to ID their bodies, and instead are opting for artful ink. In 2005 and 2006, I blogged, on Needled.com, stories of how many caught in the mission-accomplished zone were getting identifying information tattooed on various limbs in case they were mutilated. One Bagdad tattoo artist said that, while many young men today are coming in for motifs like dragons and tigers instead of their names and addresses, he still keeps a low profile "for fear of being attacked by extremists who see his work as being prohibited by Islam or too Westernized."

A couple seeking to open a tattoo studio in Tempe, Arizona who had their business permit revoked won the right to open up shop, again. The city had appealed a court ruling in favor of the couple but to no avail. When will cities learn to stop wasting money on these suits and allow studios to open, thereby bringing more money into city tax coffers?


In celeb tattoo news ... 

The LA Times reports that High Voltage tattoo, featured on the reality show LA Ink, is now a top tourist destination along with Kim Kardashian's clothing stores and The Hill's hot spots. The article says, "The manager of High Voltage Tattoo estimates that 90% of its customers are fans of the TV show." So I guess that makes only 10% serious tattoo collectors?

I'm no hater, but I'm not lovin the show either, especially after reading in Inked Mag that top tattooists Hannah Aitchison and Kim Saigh won't be returning to the show because of their lack of drama. I prefer my artists drama-free, thanks, and if they have more time for yoga practice before opening up my skin, well, the better. [Although a faux Aitchison/Saigh lesbian relationship would've been a hot episode.]

The new season will get plenty of drama with the addition of Rock of Love hot mess Aubry Fisher.
 
margaret cho unzipped.jpgBy the way Kim's new Vans are out. Nice.

Also check Margaret Cho's tattoolicious cover for Unzipped [a gay adult industry mag is obvs NSFW]. Her new show Drop Dead Diva premiered this week and is a comedy with body image as its central theme, one not uncommon to heavily tattooed peeps. I loved it.  

Ashley Tisdale got a tattoo. Yeah, I don't care either.

Another autograph tattoo, this time, Paul McCartney. Let it Be Bleed.

Cameron Diaz sports a faux tattoo on V Mag in her tribute cover to Madonna.


And of course ...


More Michael Jackson tribute tattoos.

Apr200921
12:42 PM
Jondix Tattoo2.jpgTattoo by Jondix of LTW Tattoo in Barcelona, Spain -- one of the many featured artists in my upcoming book on blackwork tattooing due out this Fall. More black tattoo photos to come. 

I'm just getting over the food and ouzo orgy that was this past weekend's Greek Easter celebration, a Brooklyn backyard bacchanal where chasing around unsuspecting guests with a lamb tongue on BBQ tongs is not only encouraged but specifically laid out in the Bible, right next to promoting "opposite marriage." [See the gory Greeky pix on Facebook.]

Lucky for me, the news was not as juicy as our giblets, so I didn't have too many headlines to trawl through, but I did catch a few tasty treats on the net. Here goes:

More people are getting medic alert tattoos, prompting the medical community to address the legal and ethical issues behind them. Over the years, I've seen A LOT of Do Not Resuscitate (DNR) tattoos, particularly on people over 70 -- like this fiesty Kiwi who sparked debate worldwide last year over the enforceability of DNR ink. In the US, a mere DNR tattoo generally won't cut it. You need to back up your wishes with a valid DNR Order. Better use of those tattoos would be alerts of serious allergies, pre-existing conditions and even blood type, but hell, the jewelry has been doing a good job at that, so save ya skin for art.

In a reminder of how tattoos were once put to horrific use, Auschwitz camp survivors were reunited Sunday at Israel's Holocaust memorial Yad Vashem. The AP reports:

As terrified teenagers 65 years ago, Menachem Sholowicz and Anshel Sieradzki stood in line together in Auschwitz, having serial numbers tattooed on their arms. Sholowicz was B-14594; Sieradzki was B-14595.

The two Polish Jews had never met, they never spoke and they were quickly separated. Each survived the Nazi death camp, moved to Israel, married, and became grandfathers. They didn't meet again until a few weeks ago, having stumbled upon each other through the Internet.

[...]  the name Sieradzki on the Web site didn't ring a bell. Then Sholowicz, 80, saw the man's number and he froze.

"I rolled up my sleeve and sure enough -- I stood exactly ahead of him in line at Auschwitz," he said. The discovery "was a moment of great emotion, great excitement. We went through it all together. We are like two parallel lines that never met."

He called Sieradzki the next day. They recently met halfway between their homes in Haifa and Jerusalem, and a photo of them and their tattoos appeared in an Israeli newspaper.


This AP photo of the men has also been widely circulating around the Internet.

auschwitz tattoos.jpg
The small numbers needled in Auschwitz have been some of the greatest modern day symbols, not only serving as reminders of the genocide but also of survival and unity, as shown in the article.

Auschwitz tattoos have also had an impact on modern Jewish culture in relation to young Jews wishing to get artful ink, with the dark stigma carried over (beyond biblical texts on body markings).

For the best discussion on Jews and tattoos, read Craig Dershowitz's interview with Rabbi Henry Harris.


In more news on culture and tattoos, the Isle of Man's Manx Heritage Foundation is photographing people with Manx tattoos for a new promo campaign. The most popular tattoo is the "Three Legs of Man" symbol, which Wikipedia says originates in the legend that the Celtic god Manannan defeated invaders by transforming into the three legs and rolling down the hill.

If only there was as good a story behind the San Jose Shark Man.

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Marisa Kakoulas
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Miguel Collins
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