Results tagged “Michele Wortman”

May201302
09:12 AM

Alex Grey tattoo by James Kern.jpgAlex Grey tattoo by James Kern 2.jpgThere are many fine artists who have influenced tattoo art, whether it be the subject matter of their paintings or the techniques they use translated on skin or their philosophy of creation. Alex Grey has inspired tattooists in all of these ways. In turn, Alex has embraced the tattoo community and worked with tattooists like James Kern, whose work is shown above, as well as Guy Aitchison and Michele Wortman, among many others. More recently, these artists created the Visionary Tattoo Workshop and Live Painting. The hope is to see more of those events take place, and in a space that is a work of art in itself.

The vision of that space for Alex and Allyson Grey is Entheon.

In NY's Hudson Valley is the Grey's Chapel of Sacred Mirrors or CoSM, a center for visionary arts and culture. What they'd like to do is evolve CoSM into "a building that is a sculpture" where people can "take a journey through art."  In order to do that, they are seeking help via Kickstarter -- and there are tons of great perks. How the Greys envision Entheon is best described in the video below, and you can find images of the plan for the space on their Kickstarter page. Also on that page is a video from Alex's TEDx talk, "How Art Evolves Consciousness," which I highly recommend checking.

Considering Alex's impact on the tattoo community, it would be wonderful to see artists give back (especially if they tattoo his images) and support this project.   

Feb201324
08:14 AM


In a wonderful marriage of tattoos and technology, the fine folks of TattooNow TV present The Paradise Artist Retreat Skype Preview Extravaganza -- live artist interviews streamed online, where you can also participate and ask questions from the chat room.

The extravaganza kicks off today at 5PM EST, with this brilliant artist line-up: Alex and Allyson Grey, Guy Aitchison, Jeff Gogue, James Kern, Chet Zar, Michele Wortman, Damon Conklin, and Steve Peace. The talk will be a taste of whats to come at the Paradise Artist Retreat, which takes place March 25-28 in Tamaya Resort, New Mexico. 

You can check the previous TattooNow webisode here featuring Guy Aitchison, Markus Lenhard, Gunnar, and Kelly Doty. A true tattoo education.

Dec201214
08:02 AM
guy aitchiso michelle wortman.jpg
I had such a pleasure interviewing tattoo power couple Michele Wortman and Guy Aitchison of Hyperspace Studios for the January issue of Inked magazine's Icon feature. [It's the one with Kat Von D and Deadmau5 all lovey on the cover (pre-breakup).]

In the interview, Michele and Guy share how their distinctive artistic styles developed, some of the controversy behind their approaches, how one can be a better artist through attitude adjustment, and their most cherished collaboration: baby Kaia Rose.

Here's a bit from our talk:

You're both renowned for your distinctive styles. How would you describe them?


GUY: I work in abstract style--a lot of different abstract styles--but generally it's earned the definition of biomechanical. This can take many forms as long as it's a nonrepresentational kind of tattooing that flows with the human form. it could be something that is either kind of robotic--imagine a Transformers style--or it could be something a bit more organic, like an alien exoskeleton with all kinds of crazy textures. or sometimes you get a mix. People who get tattoos from me generally just want to get tattooed. a lot of people feel like they need to have a pretext for their tattoo that symbolizes something, but people who have collected enough often will arrive at a place where they are getting tattooed because they're getting tattooed. They like tattoos. They are looking to be decorated. That's the number one rule of this style. Make it attractive, make it flow well with the body, make it sort of exaggerate the musculature a bit. it's meant to be flattering but also meant to instill a sense of, "Wow, I've never seen anything like that before." When people come across it, they should be stopped in their tracks a bit.

guy aitchison tattoo.jpg Guy Aitchison Tattoo above.

When you first started tattooing and developing this style in 1988, it was really new and innovative.


GUY: Well, I wasn't the first person to do this stuff. I was attracted to H.R. Giger's paintings. That was part of what got me interested in tattooing initially. I wanted to tattoo stuff like that. For those not familiar, Giger designed the sets and monsters for Ridley Scott's Alien movie. It has this look that just has a natural flow, great depth, and a sense of realism to it. I thought it would look great on skin. in my first year of tattooing, I came across a few people who were actually doing Giger paintings as tattoos, and a few had done a really nice job of it. It definitely proved the point that it was a viable style. I then started hanging around a few of these tattooers: Eddie Deutsche, Greg Kulz, aaron cain, and Marcus Pacheco. These are the ones who were really exploring the abstract style at the time. We started working on each other and collaborating in various different mediums, and then diverged away from being Giger clones, and each of us looked to redefine what we were seeing. In particular, I was looking for ways to make it look stronger as a tattoo. I was working with bigger shapes that flowed with the body as the structure for the whole thing. and then you have basically this infinite variety of textures and effects, lighting, things that you can apply to it. So it was definitely influenced by H.R. Giger and by these other tattooers I worked with, but at this particular juncture, 23 years later, it's certainly taken on its own look.

Michele, how did your style develop?

MICHELE: My style originated from being a collector and not necessarily resonating with the early work I collected. I started to assess it more and realized that I wanted something that was more unified, that had less weight to it, and that reflected more of how I was feeling rather than the styles that were available at the time.

Around when was that?

MICHELE: It was around 1995 when I first got a half sleeve. I know that's not very much coverage, but at the time it seemed it, because you didn't really see women with the coverage you see now, and it felt like a big step. Then I got a chest piece a year later. My work had a fair amount of black in it, and I wanted something that felt lighter and a little freer. So I started getting lasered, getting rid of all the black in my ink so that I could reconstruct it, and during that period of time, I became a tattoo artist.

 

michele wortman tattoo.jpgMichele Wortman tattoo above.

Would you say your style is more feminine?

MICHELE: It's interesting you should say that because originally I had wanted a half sleeve of flowers, and this girl looked at me, rolled her eyes, and said, "You would get that. How typical of you." That bothered me, so I decided I would rebel against my feminine nature and get architecture, which is very masculine in my opinion, very manmade. The fact that i rebelled against my feminine nature in the beginning only to come back to it later was an interesting lesson for me--to be comfortable and enjoy things that might be associated with having feminine qualities and not try to fight it and be someone I'm not. That had a lot to do with the energy i was putting into my tattoo work, and that became my defining style.

Black is really part of the old-school tattoo tradition, black and bold. Have you ever been criticized for not following these tattoo tenets?

MICHELE: Absolutely. I've been heavily criticized for my style. I've had people come up to me at tattoo conventions, slam my portfolio down, and tell me that what I was doing wasn't tattooing. So I had a steep hill to climb, and I still feel like I'm climbing it. But if you believe in what you do, you need to stick with it.

Do you have a response to the technical critiques?

MICHELE: I do have a response. Early on there was some validity to their assessment because I was just learning to tattoo and my work wasn't as developed as it is now. It was definitely very experimental, not using black outlines. The black has a boldness to it, and it does seem that it stays in the skin better, so I can see their point. The thing is, work that is soft in contrast with a limited use of black needs multiple passes. If someone has a piece that doesn't look so hot, it's not necessarily because it won't work. You really need to get that saturation and develop contrast over multiple sessions, since you don't have a strong, bold line holding your design in place. It's a different approach to tattooing, so it has its own flavor of rebellion in there, even though it may be viewed as a stereotypical feminine aesthetic.

Read the rest of the Q&A here

Also check Guy & Michele's online resource for tattooists and collectors:  Tattooeducation.com.
Oct201230
12:43 PM
Michele Wortman floral tattoo.jpg
Michele Wortman floral tattoo3.jpg
As we wade our way through the floods and debris left by Hurricane Sandy, I want to focus today on the beauty, rather than destructiveness, of nature. The first artist who naturally came to mind, particularly with her floral-form bodysets, is Michele Wortman of Hyperspace Studios in Illinois.

I had a wonderful time interviewing Michele and her husband -- renowned biomechanical artist Guy Aitchison -- for an upcoming issue of Inked magazine. In it, we talked about how their distinctive artist styles developed, some of the controversy behind their approaches, and how one can be a better artist through attitude adjustment.

Here's a taste of that interview where Michele describes her bodysets:  ethereal, organic tattoos with a unified look throughout in the large scale projects.

Michele, how did your style develop?
My style originated from being a collector and not necessarily resonating with the early work I collected. I started to assess it more and realized that I wanted something that was more unified, that had less weight to it, and that reflected more of how I was feeling rather than what the styles were available at the time.

Around when was that?

It was around 1995 when I first got a half sleeve. I know that's not very much coverage but, at the time, it seemed it because you didn't really see women with the coverage you see now, and it felt like a big step. Then I got a chest piece a year later. My work had a fair amount of black in it, and I wanted something that felt lighter and a little freer. So I started getting lasered, getting rid of all the black in my ink so that I could reconstruct it, and during that period of time, I became a tattoo artist.

Would you say your style is more feminine?

It's interesting you should say that because, originally, I had wanted a half sleeve of flowers and this girl looked at me, rolled her eyes and said, "You would get that. How typical of you." That bothered me, so I decided I would rebel against my "feminine nature" and get architecture, which is very masculine in my opinion, very man-made. The fact that I rebelled against my feminine nature in the beginning only to come back to it later was an interesting lesson for me-to be comfortable and enjoy things that might be associated with having feminine qualities and not try to fight it and be someone I'm not. That had a lot to do with the energy I was putting into my tattoo work and that became my defining style.
More of our interview will be in an Inked "Icon" feature. I'll do a follow-up post when the issue is out. To view more of Michele's work, check her Facebook page as well as the Hyperspace website.
 

Michele Wortman floral tattoo4.jpg
Jul201202
01:14 PM
the visionary tattoo.jpgFor those on the East Coast, I have another fantastic event, also on Saturday July 21:  The worlds of tattooing and visionary art will come together in a live event at Alex Grey's historic Chapel of Sacred Mirrors in upstate New York. Veteran tattooists Guy Aitchison and Michele Wortman will be teaching a workshop on Visionary Tattooing -- that is, tattoos that come from the imagination that are done with the intention of healing, empowerment or positive transformation. There's limited seating available. Click here for ticket info.

For those who can't make it in person, there will be a free live webcast of the evening's events beginning at 5:00pm EST. Go to www.tattoonowtv.com/visionary_tattoo.html to tune in and be a part of it online.

The events will include the following:

** A screening of the documentary "Innerstate," nominated for Best Documentary at the 2010 Great Lakes Film Festival, about tattooists creating visionary paintings. Here's the trailer below.
 

** A dynamic panel talk on visionary, magical and ritual tattooing, featuring Alex and Allyson Grey, Guy Aitchison, Michele Wortman, James Kern and Natan Alexander.

** A live painting event that will go from the end of the panel talk until the wee hours. Alex, Allyson, Guy and Michele will be creating visionary paintings while DJs keep the energy going. You can check out some previous live painting events here and here.

Check this short promo trailer for The Visionary Tattoo below.




To view Guy & Michele's tattoo work, including the pieces below, head to Hyperspacestudios.com and their studio's Facebook page.

guy aitchison tattoo.jpgTattoo by Guy above.

michele wortman tattoo.jpgTattoo by Michele Wortman.
Apr201008
02:01 PM
ProtonSocietyAdSmall.jpg
This week, legendary tattooists Guy Aitchison and Michele Wortman have expanded their book publishing company, Proton Press, to include instrumental music produced within the tattoo industry.

The music label kicks off with five albums, each with their own signature electro-groove: Sunchannel by Michele Wortman; Hydrone by Brion Norwalk, a tattooist from Ohio; Divine Machine by Corey Cudney, a tattooist from Buffalo, NY; Satchi Om (self-titled), a tattoo collector from Oakland, CA; and Sursum by Peter Stauber, a tattoo collector from Las Vegas.

You can preview the music here and also purchase them as downloads or CDs.


Chris Stauber interviewed Guy & Michelle about this new venture. Here's a taste of that talk:

What is the connection between visual art and music?

Music really sets the mood and energy for how you experience your surroundings and how you feel. Both Guy and I have been deep into electronic music for well over a decade and usually play that kind of music when doing artwork and tattooing. Besides our own enjoyment of it and how we feel it helps us to expand our creative groove with people whom we work on and who seem to really resonate with it. We enjoy the mood it creates for getting tattooed to finding it atmospheric while at the same time energetic. It is easy to zone to but also keeps things going. It creates an elevated sense of space, which coincides well with creating elevated artwork. Electronic music is neurally stimulating much in the same way that Salvador Dali's paintings are. It is imaginative and open to interpretation.


What does Proton Press hope to accomplish with this new music label?

We hope to share this sound and spread the sonic frequencies across the land. Would love tattoo shops to play it and artists and clients to find it stimulating to work to.

We are launching the Proton music at the premiere release party in the special events room during Hell City Tattoo Convention on Saturday night, May 22nd. This will be a night of live performances from all 5 projects. Be sure to check out the room if you are there for the convention. It should be an amazing experience.
1
connect with us
advertisement
archives
advertisement






EDITOR IN CHIEF:
Marisa Kakoulas
CONTRIBUTORS:
Miguel Collins
Craig Dershowitz
Brian Grosz
Sean Risley
Patrick Sullivan
© 2009-2013 NEEDLES AND SINS. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.
Needles and Sins powered by Moveable Type.

Site designed and programmed by Striplab.

NS logo designed by Viktor Koen.