Results tagged “Mo Coppoletta”

Feb201604
02:40 PM
Alex Binnie London map.jpgThe Museum of London's "Tattoo London," which opened January 29th, has been creating a lot of buzz with its exhibit that explores the history of professional tattooing in London as well as tattooing today. Featured artists who created original works for the show include Lal Hardy at New Wave, Claudia de Sabe at Seven Doors, Mo Coppoletta at The Family Business, and Alex Binnie at Into You Tattoo.

Now the prints of their commissioned works are available for purchase online here, including Alex's
"Body of London" (above), which he describes as "a lyrical map of London, envisioned as a body, the beating heart of SOHO, the parks as lungs and the 'villages' blossoming flowers." The prints start at 25 BP for a small version, then up to 80 BP for extra large.

"Tattoo London" runs until until May 8, 2016. As I noted in an earlier post, on February 22, there will be an event "Tattoo London: under the skin," where you can meet these artists and also enjoy an illustrated talk by our friend and tattoo history expert Dr. Matt Lodder.

A good deal of the research behind the exhibit comes from Matt's work, which has been discussed in recent articles on the show, including this article in The Independent and this BBC article.

Doesn't look like I'll make it to the show, but I like that artwork from the show is available for all. Check it.
Jan201611
08:26 AM
tattoo london.png [Image copyright Kate Berry]

From January 29 until May 8, 2016, the Museum of London will show "Tattoo London," an exhibit that explores the history of professional tattooing in London as well as tattooing today. On display will be newly commissioned artworks by tattooists from the city's most renowned studios: Lal Hardy at New Wave, Alex Binnie at Into You, Claudia de Sabe at Seven Doors, and Mo Coppoletta at The Family Business.

On February 22, there will be an event "Tattoo London: under the skin," where you can meet these artists and also enjoy an illustrated talk by our friend and tattoo history expert Dr. Matt Lodder. It's a party, so there will be music and an after-hours bar.

A good deal of the research behind the exhibit comes from Matt's work, which is also discussed an article in The Independent on the exhibit. Here's a bit from that piece:

It has recently emerged that Macdonald was the first person in the Post Office Directory, the Yellow Pages of its day, to offer a professional tattoo service in London. The publication created the category of tattooists for him in 1894, and he was the only entry under that heading for the next four years.

Matt Lodder, a lecturer in contemporary art and visual culture at the University of Essex who worked on the exhibition, said: "While tattooing was going on, there is no evidence of another professional studio in Britain at the time, working on paying customers."

[...]

Macdonald worked in London's Jermyn Street and was considered one of the pioneers, alongside Tom Riley and, later, Burchett. He said his clients ran from assorted dukes and maharajahs to the kings of Norway and Denmark.

Britain's King Edward VII was tattooed in Jerusalem and his son George V acquired body art in Japan, sparking a trend among the public. 

"One of the reasons Macdonald was so busy was because people wanted to copy the king," Dr Lodder said. "Macdonald claimed to have tattooed George V, but he probably did not."

More of Matt's findings in the Independent article.

It looks to be an informative and fun exhibition, with a good run, so I'm hoping to get to London before May 8th to check it.

Aug201131
01:06 PM
Garage Magazine Tattoo.jpgIt's no surprise there's tons of buzz surrounding the September 5th launch of Garage magazine. How does one not write about a Dasha Zhukova project that features Damien Hirst's art on a young model's vagina -- tattooed by Mo Coppoletta, no less?

Timed perfectly for NY Fashion Week, The NY Times describes the debut issue as "one of the most intriguing magazines to come along in years, it is not entirely clear whether this is a fashion magazine that takes more than a passing interest in art, or an art magazine that knows its stuff about fashion."

The magazine seems to know its stuff about tattoos as well, commissioning renowned tattooists Mike Rubendall in New York and Lindsey Carmichael in California to work with Coppoletta in London on the "Inked" spread of black and white portraits (photographed by Hedi Slimane) featuring "willing canvases" and their new tattoo work.

Such work includes Rubendall's execution of Jeff Koons art (shown below) and Carmichael's lettering of John Baldessari's "I will not wear any more boring tattoos." Coppoletta also tattooed a Dinos Chapman design on Dinos himself:  a pointed hand etching with the words "I'm with this idiot" underneath. [The high art ironic tattoo will no doubt be big in Brooklyn in about five seconds.]

View the full tattoo spread in this Daily Beast gallery.

Jeff Koons Mike Rubendall tattoo.jpg
The genital ink, however, has kept Coppoletta most busy with the press. Even the New York Post hit him up for details in an article that also quotes the proud owner of the tattoo saying:

I would have been stupid not to be part of this project. I have a piece of art on my vagina. Not one single person can ever say they gave birth through a Damien Hirst piece of art. I can [if I ever give birth].
The article further states that she threw a garden party in honor of her new vagina.

I too contacted Coppoletta for more info, and here's what he said:

The magazine informed me that Damien had handpicked me for this project and I agreed to take it on. I was curious about the design to be submitted, and on receiving it, we began to bounce the design backward and forwards until the final draft was agreed.

The butterfly needed to be adapted to the physicality of the area. The final tattoo was very close to the original design, but I needed to modify a few elements for it to be more tattooable.
When asked about the challenges of tattooing genitals, he said that there were no special techniques he used on that type of skin, and that the difficulty really lies in reach and body positioning.

On one of the Garage magazine covers, the actual tattoo is obscured with a peel-away butterfly sticker, a nod to the Warhol banana sticker on The Velvet Underground & Nico album. Nevertheless, it's already being banned by WHSmith booksellers. The two other covers are a sketch of Richard Prince's smiling tattoo design, and a Nick Knight photo of Dinos Chapman's dollhouse complete with Lily Donaldson puppet. See them on High Snobiety.

Looking forward to getting my hands on all three next week. Garden party to follow.
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