Results tagged “Noon”

Feb201214
12:12 PM
yann black heart tattoo.jpg
Tattoo by Yann Black, Montreal.


Tim Kern Heart Tattoo.jpgTattoo by Tim Kern, NYC.


Wiesbeck heart tattoo.jpgTattoo by Gerd Wiesbeck, Landshut, Germany


Orrin Hurley heart.jpgTattoo by Orrin Hurley, NYC.


noon heart tattoo.jpgTattoo by Noon, France & On the Road.
Jun201107
04:05 PM
gene coffey tattoo.jpg
In the latest issue of Skin & Ink magazine (August 2011), I take a look at the progressive work coming out of Brooklyn's own Tattoo Culture via resident artist Gene Coffey (whose work is shown here) and a host of international talent including Belgium's blackwork specialist Dan DiMattia, and France's avant-garde artists Noon and Loic [aka Xoil], among many others. In fact, owner Chris Budd acts as a "tattoo concierge," helping tattooers from outside New York find places to stay, procure temporary permits, and build a local fan base.

While Tattoo Culture is a full-service custom shop where clients get tattoos in a variety of styles, the focus of the article is the more controversial work that push the definition of what a tattoo should be. Here's a bit of that discussion:

[Gene] credits the roster of guest artists at Tattoo Culture for his artistic growth. "We just feed off of each other's creativity. If I had never worked with people like Noon or Loic, for example, I wouldn't have even tried something weird like what I've been doing lately."

The "weird" tattoos that Gene refers to are abstract pen and ink watercolor styled designs. [Shown below] It began when a long-time client was flipping through Gene's sketchbook and said she wanted to get one of his drawings tattooed on her. They agreed on the drawing, and after it was permanently inked, they both loved the result. Gene says, "It felt really awesome. It was the first time a tattoo was a hundred percent my art. It wasn't drawn to be a tattoo. It was drawn because of something I felt, something that just came out of my head."

Since that time, Gene has further explored translating his fine art on skin, but he's quick to note that he still employs traditional tattoo technique. "The things that I tattoo - even the weird abstract work - still follow the fundamentals of tattooing. There's line work, there's contrast, there's shading, there's saturation of the colors. It's still a tattoo, just different imagery."
Beyond the weirdness (and Gene himself is a strange egg), Tattoo Culture has a relaxed friendly vibe that seems to stand in contrast to the cooler-than-cool attitude of their Williamsburg neighborhood, also known as ground zero for hipsters. The studio also holds regular art shows, exhibiting classic tattoo-inspired painting, photography, mixed media and modern works. 

Check their Facebook page for events and guest artists. Gene regularly updates his portfolio on his own Facebook page as well.

gene coffey tattoo culture.jpg
Mar201015
11:46 AM
noon heart tattoo.jpg
Tattooed New Yorkers looking for love should head over to Waterhole Bar & Restaurant in the Flatiron District at 7:30PM tonight for their "Inked Speed Dating" event. The Village Voice explains:

"Decorated men and women (and the men and women who love them) are invited to attend this romantic mixing marathon and find the skin of their dreams, as well as the person inhabiting it. Who needs pickup lines when 'show and tell' is in order?"

And be sure to tell us how it goes. Price for inclusion is $25.

The joined heart tattoo above is by Noon. Read more on the artist here.
Oct200923
05:07 PM
Brent McCown tattooing.jpgMy Brooklyn homies, Chris Budd and Gene Coffey of Tattoo Culture just got back from last weekend's Evian Tattoo Expo in France and had a blast. Today, Gene takes over Needles & Sins to offer his review of the show.

Also check Gene's pix of the convention on Flickr.


By Gene Coffey

After a short train ride from Geneva, Switzerland to Evian, France, Chris Budd and I began our Evian Tattoo Convention adventure. A quaint little town on the lake that borders Switzerland and France, Evian seemed an odd place to put on a tattoo convention. We arrived Thursday, a day before the show began, and the town felt sleepy and unaware of the potential madness that was about to descend on it. Old french couples, poodles in tow, strolled the cobblestone streets peering at the obvious outsiders dragging our luggage noisily towards our hotel. Check-in. Drop bags in rooms. Let's see what Evian has to offer. We headed to a little pub at the end of the block and grabbed a bite. Cheese crapes and coffee presented by an angry old french man in a restaurant that stunk of the old mangy dog pacing the floor and leering at the customers. It was going to be a loooooong weekend.

horitada horimono.jpgThe sun rose behind a backdrop of mountains, marking the entrance of the weekend and the beginning of the convention. We headed over to the Palais des Congres for Friday morning set-up. The space is awesome: three floors with a fountain outside, a beautiful facade, a stage and skylights. We were greeted by Dats, the organizer of the show, who was warm and welcoming even under the obvious pressures of putting on such a shin dig. We headed upstairs to our booth. It was huge and directly under the skylights. Our booth-mates hadn't arrived yet, we I began to set up.

Destiny and fate had prompted me to shave my beard just days before leaving New York, but I opted to leave the mustache intact. Then as our friends Noon and Xoil from Needle's Side arrived I was overjoyed to behold that both of them were also sporting the most dapper of manly mustaches too. Instantly we became the Mustache Men. Patrons began to file in and the air filled with the buzzing of machines and murmurs of french. Cheek kissing abounded.

stachetastic.jpgWithin an hour of the convention starting, I already had a customer and the tattooing began. I felt a bit like the odd man out in our booth. I didn't know anyone there and didn't speak any french, so it was a great escape to go right to work. A couple hours later I had finished the piece and was pumped to walk around and see what everyone was up to. Chris had already made the rounds so he stayed in the booth and I wandered the isles. The caliber of artists in attendance was superb. Kevin LeBlanc, Adrian Dominic, Horitada, Tommy Lee, Olivier, Brent McCown and many more made for a well rounded selection of styles from around the world.  The day marched on at the usual pace of every convention until...

The most horrible, soul crushing, embarrassing, pathetic display of unashamed human behavior ensued as the GodGirls took to the stage for the "Sexy Show". I can honestly say that it was the first time in my life where I have seen a hot, naked girl and been so entirely turned off that my penis almost inverted itself and tried to turtle head its way back into my abdomen. The first girl to come on stage to dance and strip in what I suppose was some mutated French version of burlesque was best described by Chris when he turned to me and said "She looks like a deaf person trying to dance to music she can't hear." And it went downhill from there. I'm all for public nudity, but MY GOD!!! If your going to do a "Sexy Show" perhaps a little rehearsal in front of a mirror might do a bit of good before you go on stage and make an "ass" of yourself.

Friday ended. Saturday began at 10a.m. The convention was packed with people by 11. It was really great working with Noon and Xoil. Their work it so happy and carefree that everyone who came up to our booth instantly broke into a smile. They taught me a few key phrases in french which helped me to spread my American sense of humor to the unsuspecting french people. "Bonjour. Voulez-vous sentir ma mustache?" was my favorite.

Evian Tattoo Expo.jpgThe weekend was one of the most positive tattoo convention experiences I have had. The attendees were all friendly people. Very few d-bags. No biker brawls. And lots of amazing tattoos! It was sad when it ended Sunday night. Gear was packed. People faded away. Quiet returned to this little french town. But not before 25 of us went to have one last bash at a local restaurant. Good food and great new friends was the perfect way to end the convention.

One of the great things about Evian is that it is a 40 minute ferry ride away from Lausanne, Switzerland. Home to Filip Leu. Monday morning Chris and I headed there to visit him. He was super welcoming. Gave us some coffee and we hung out for about an hour. It was awesome to see his shop and his artwork. It felt like a tattoo mecca. As people (about 30 of them) arrived we took it as our cue to break out. We said our goodbyes and it was all over.

Au revoir, Evian. Voulez-vous sentir ma mustache?
--
See more of Gene's Tattoo Work on his Flickr Portfolio.
Oct200913
10:58 AM
gene coffey 2.jpg
Tattoo Culture in Williamburg, Brooklyn has always been a second home for me. Owner Chris Budd has given his big, beautiful studio over as our Needles & Sins party and gallery space, an office for me to blog when I wanna break outta my apartment, and just a hangout of good friends and artists from all over the world.

Now, Tattoo Culture has found a home here on this site in their advertising support, as you'll find their distinct logo to the left.

Resident artist Gene Coffey is skilled at all styles, from abstract to Japanese to lettering and, most important, his clients love him because he doesn't bring attitude to the studio but a great sense of humor. His work is featured in this post.

gene coffey 1.jpgWhat also makes Tattoo Culture special is that it acts as a concierge studio to international tattooists, artists who bring tattoo styles that are rare to find even in the NY metropolis, like the Art Brut style of Noon or the blackwork of Daniel DiMattia. Other artists have included Max.Schmal of Austria, Jake Abandonment and Adam of Darklite from Australia, Sento of Spain, among may others.

The current guest artist is my homegirl Emilie aka Klak of Belgium who is an old school tattoo diva but can rock a black & grey piece like she came from LA. Emilie will be tattooing at the studio until mid-November.

In fact, she's taking over for the week as Gene and Chris head to this weekend's Evian Tattoo Show in France. Chris will be taking photos and bringing back a report for Needles & Sins, so look out for that in the coming weeks.

gene coffey 3.jpg
If you're interested in advertising on N+S, hit me up through the contact link. 
Sep200930
12:08 PM
gene coffey art.jpg
This Friday, October 2nd from 7-10PM, join the Needles and Sins crew in Williamsburg, Brooklyn at Tattoo Culture's Fourth Anniversary Group Art Show opening.

On view, the fine art work of tattooists including the legendary Bugs, Dan Marshall, Liorcifer and Tim Kern, Dana Helmuth, David Sena, Emma Griffiths, Noon of France, and TC's resident artist Gene Coffey (whose oil painting is shown above), among other artists.

Many of you know most of our Needles and Sins events are held at Tattoo Culture because it's a large beautiful space close to subways and easy parking, but more important, it's an attitude free zone where people can enjoy the art work, chill, and party without pretension.

And yes, there will be free booze.

The show runs until November 13th. Hope to see y'all Friday.
Jul200913
12:19 PM
heart tattoo.jpg
On Friday, we decided it was time to tell the world about Needles and Sins after amassing content for months, and in response to our mass mail, we're already feelin the love.

Maybe not to the extent as this couple -- tattooed by Noon of France -- but enough to inspire a redux of the 10 most popular posts, based on clicks and comments, for those new to the site.

If you want to slack off at work or enjoy your severance package with some tattoo goodness, the best way to navigate all posts is to either click the Category of your choice or hit up our Monthly Archives (both right).

To get you goin, here are the faves for each N+S blogger, starting with a post inspired by this heart tattoo:


Pat Sullivan hung out at Brooklyn's Tattoo Culture for weeks watching Noon work his "Art Brut" tattoo style before profiling him here. [We also call this style French Avant Garde of tattoo because the fresh, experimental work has been developed and refined in France and Francophone Belgium.]

Pat most recently had fun with tattoos in pop culture, deciding if Conan O'Brien did indeed get tattooed on air. Watch the video here.

Craig Dershowitz, our tattoo Jew, had one of the most linked posts on N+S ever: his provocative Q&A with Orthodox Rabbi Henry Harris. Craig not only put to rest the fallacy that you cannot be buried in a Jewish cemetery with a tattoo but also challenges the Rabbi to find the roots of tattoo prejudice in the community. It's a brilliant read worth further link love.

He also pokes fun at common motifs with his Top 5 Worst Jewish Tattoos including the Chai, The Hebrew letter representing long life. "Usually tattooed on the most unhealthy individuals."

Brian Grosz, N+S resident rockstar and founder of indie record label Lapdance Academy, took inspiration from Groucho Marx and Kermit the Frog in creating his own carny rendition of Lydia, The Tattoo Lady, a tune I guarantee you will not be able to get outta ya head for the rest of the day if you stream it here or download it for free here. His most brilliant find was digging up Lydia, The Tattooed Muppet video, one of the most beloved Kermie solos ever. Check it:




The other video Brian found that made us giggle is the Jon Stewart clip on Long Island seceding from New York, complete with tattoo "gun show."

Miguel Collins, long time tattoo blogger who is creating a documentary on tattoos in the Black community, not only offers up his perspective on tattoos and race -- for example in discussing the first magazine ever geared towards people of color, but also blogs on West Coast happenings from his Cali outpost, like an Evening with Horiyoshi III at Canvas LA.

My personal faves of Miguel's are his review of Margo DeMello's Bodies of Inscription,
one of the more recent publications to talk about race, class and "cultural appropriation" in tattooing. Also click on his Tattoo Statistics post for the most recent data on tattooed and pierced people in America.

Bobby Fisher. Ah, Bobby. The graff mag magistrate of Bombin just simply causes trouble and so we've locked him up in a Williamsburg hipster bowling alley and play Clap Your Hands & Say Yeah for hours on end, that is, until he learns to be a (dodge ball) team player.

As for me, the weekly news reviews remain a popular staple from my old Needled.com days, but my personal favorites are all about tattoo-related toys and gadgets, ala Totally Stylin Tattoos Barbie and the Tattoo Shop iPhone app -- both of which I own and play with regularly because, yes, I am a proud tattooed nerd.

If you've got a personal favorite or have ideas for posts you want to read in the future, let us know in the comments.

Ok, I'm off to work on the news.

May200921
12:00 AM
noon chest tattoo.jpg Good readers, let me take this time to suggest you toss out that old tape recorder from the 80s you may have used to interview various tattoo artists in the past, especially if you've recently discovered that during your latest interview it failed to record anything at all and, instead, still has the four gloriously terrible songs from your short-lived lark of a synth-heavy goofball hardcore band AXXX WOUND.

Good thing I was able to hang out with French tattooer Noon for a few weeks before getting him to sit down for an interview. So instead of a nice and neat little Q and A, you get a nice and neat little quasi-article from some feverishly taken notes before Noon booked for more international travels. And while it seems Noon is constantly on the move, he's made a semi-permanent home at Tattoo Culture in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, usually returning twice a year.

Recently featured in the May issue of Total Tattoo, Noon has created a style instantly recognizable and completely his own. It's something I'd rather let him describe, though he plainly says, "It's difficult to explain. I would say it's minimalist, it's singular. I don't know if there's a real name for this. The way I started was with the idea that the tattoo could be finished with only the line."

noon_tattoo.jpg

Growing up in a town full of ex-cons and gypsies, Noon's studied how they tattooed. "I watched them attach needles to pencils and set the ink bottle on a small plate over a flame. Very basic. I was young and in the poor part of town. All the guys there were tattooed and tattooing all the time. So I watched them. And at ten years old, I already knew how they did it. There was no color, no fill, only the line."

Noon's gypsy education could only go so far. He retained the basics and began to learn himself. He explains, "There were no magazines, no Internet. So in 1996 I got the address of Mickey Sharpz in London and I bought everything I could! I practiced on myself, I was always on the phone with Lionel (from Out of Step Tattoo) and we'd go back and forth asking 'How do you do this?' 'What's working for you?' It was not so easy then."

"I like the look and feel," he says, making motions with his hands that seem to be building something in mid-air. He plans to keep painting but he is a tattooist first. "Always tattooing," he says, "until they shkkt! -- chop off my hands."

Noon will be back at Tattoo Culture from November 9th through the 22nd. He's currently taking appointments via email.
Apr200909
02:32 PM
jacqueline tattoo.jpg
I'm been quiet here because I'm on deadline for my book on blackwork tattoos, but the boys have been blogging wonders, albeit cranky ones.

Blackwork is everything from traditional tribal tattooing, like the timeless Polynesian tatau ...

to neo-tribal made famous by Leo Zulueta and Trevor Marshall ...

to the dotwork technique mastered by artists including Xed Lehead, Dan DiMattia, Erik Reime and Colin Dale, among many others ...

to modern interpretations of non-traditional tattoo motifs like this henna-inspired work above by the fabulous Jacqueline Spoerlee ...

to the all-black graphic art of Yann Black, Jeff, Boucherie Moderne, Noon, and other French avant garde tattooists.

So that's what's keeping me busy these days, but I'll be back tomorrow with your news review.

xoxo
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EDITOR IN CHIEF:
Marisa Kakoulas
CONTRIBUTORS:
Miguel Collins
Craig Dershowitz
Brian Grosz
Sean Risley
Patrick Sullivan
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