Results tagged “Photography”

Nov201419
07:58 AM
Jill Bonny copy.jpgBackpiece above by Jill Bonny.

Tim Hendricks copy.jpgBackpiece above by Tim Hendricks.

Ron Earhart copy.jpgFront torso tattoo by Ron Earhart.

Stunning large-scale tattoo work by stellar tattooists are captured in Markus Cuff's new book entitled "Torso" -- a 120-page hardcover of Markus' photographs spanning 16 years, which document tattoo culture and the evolution of the art form across the United States and Pacific Islands. 

The artists include Horiyoshi III, Mike Rubendall, Horitaka, Jill Bonny, Khalil Rintye, John The Dutchman, Carlos Torres, Matt Breckerich, Clark North, Aaron Coleman, Steve Looney, Ron Earhart, Nate Bunuelos, Edwin Shaffer, George Campisi and Denny Besnard. Their differing tattoo styles conveyed in backpieces and front torso tattoos should be of interest to a wide range of tattoo enthusiasts.

The "Torso" book release and signing will be tomorrow, Thursday, November 20th, from 7-10pm, at La Luz de Jesus Gallery in Los Angeles. There, you can pick up a copy of the book; also, grab it online now here or pre-order from Amazon here.

[Interesting side note on Markus: In addition to being a photographer and artist, he was also the original drummer for Emmylou Harris and the cult band The Textones.]

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Oct201406
07:38 AM
corset tattoo.jpgscott campbell tattoo.jpgCorset tattoo by Keely Tackett and sleeve by Scott Campbell.

I'm a fan of the portrait photography of Eric Jukelevics, whose artistic style has been described as "moody" (although, that's far from his positive personality). Eric has begun a photography project inspired by his "love of awesome tattoos," entitled Illuminated Ink He offers this description of the project:

My work showcases skin as a surface with texture, shape, and movement. The final images highlight the intricate details of the tattoos and the texture of the skin. I ask each person I photograph about the origin and significance of their tattoos. Like most fine art, there is meaning and history behind each piece. When completed, the project will include a coffee table book and gallery show.
You can see more of Eric's Illuminated Ink images on his Facebook page, which also includes some of the models' stories, including that of Tamale Sepp and her corset tattoo by Keely Tackett, among others. The tattoo artists are credited, so the project has allowed me to discover tattooers whom I hadn't known of before.

Eric is looking for more models for the project, particularly those with larger pieces, although he also welcomes those with smaller intricate work as well. Eric will be shooting in his NYC photography studio on weekends.  If you're interested in becoming part of the project, you can find Eric's contact info here.

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Sep201404
02:34 PM
stephen james glamour.pngstephen james elle.jpgStephen-James-Tattoos-disrobed.jpgThese days, anyone who is young and has a neck tattoo deems oneself a "tattoo model," often striving to reach the pinnacle of that career choice: being unpaid and naked in a tattoo magazine. There are, however, professional models, who have tattoos, who represent our community wonderfully in high fashion.

One such model is Stephen James, London-born heavily tattooed hotness, who has graced the international covers and pages of Elle, Glamour, Adon, Hedonist ... and countless ad campaigns, including Diesel. [Stephen is repped by Elite Models Barcelona, Supa Models London, I Love Models Milan, and Wilhelmina Models New York.]

One of my most favorite shoots of Stephen is his "Disrobed" feature in Hedonist magazine, shot by acclaimed photographer Darren Black. [I've included images from that shoot immediately above and below.] Darren beautifully captured the model's stunning tattoo work, which Stephen informed me is largely created by Ottorino D'Ambra of Milan, who is now based in London. Stephen's tattoos include blackwork Mandalas, and portraits of punk Ian Dury and Salvador Dali. The wonderful Jondix created his chest/stomach piece.

While I'm excited to see more tattoos in popular fashion magazines, I wish the tattoo artists would be included in the credits, along with the make-up artists, stylists and others involved in the shoot. I had to reach out to Stephen myself on Facebook to find out about his work by Otto. 

See more on Stephen's Instagram and Otto's Instagram.

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Aug201407
05:29 PM
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cedric arnold yantra3.jpgSince the inception of this blog, I have shared posts on Sak Yant or Yantra tattoos -- sacred marks performed by monks in Thailand in which the wearers believe that the tattoos are imbued with magic, offering protection and even bestowing certain powers. Yantra tattoos hold a special fascination for me, not just for the beautiful iconography, but the ceremony, culture and beliefs that surround them.

Every year,
at the Buddhist temple in Wat Bang Phra, about 30 miles west of Bangkok, Thailand, devotees gather to receive these magic tattoos at the Wai Khru ceremony. Also present are journalists and photographers seeking to document it all.

One such photographer who has truly captured the power of Yantra and the Wai Khru is French/British photographer Cedric Arnold, who is based in Bangkok. Arnold's "Yantra: The Sacred Ink"  is an exceptionally beautiful series of portraits and documentary photography -- a product of four and a half years of travel throughout Thailand to fully explore Yantra, from the festivals to rare tattoos only found in certain regions. Arnold shared with Slate magazine some of what he learned in this journey:

"The ink is traditional Chinese ink but there's ash, snake venom, all sorts of things," Arnold said. "It's very much a voodoo mix, sort of a witches' brew in a way. There are some really wild rumors about certain tattoo masters who have all sorts of crazy things in there. One liquid people describe as corps oil, harvested from dead bodies."

Getting access to this world involved overcoming one special hurdle.

"If you're not tattooed yourself in certain tattoo worlds, people will be very suspicious and not let you in. I explained this was a personal project, and I wanted to understand things. When they asked me why I didn't have tattoos, I said, 'I don't belong to this belief system, so I think it would be disrespectful for me to get one.' "

You can also read more about "Yantra: The Sacred Ink" in this Boat Mag Q&A.

Arnold further captured the tattoos and ceremonies on video: his film, also entitled "Yantra: The Sacred Ink," is currently being screened at the "Tatoueurs, tatoues" exhibit at the Museum du quai Branly in Paris. [For a great review of the exhibit, read Serinde's post here.] Here's the teaser below.

See more of Arnold's work on his site and on Facebook.


'Yantra: The Sacred Ink' Teaser from Cedric Arnold on Vimeo.

May201411
08:59 PM
the tattoo project .jpgDan Kozma The Tattoo Project.jpgCover photo of The Tattoo Project by Vince Hemingson. Portrait above by Dan Kozma.

Four years ago this month, 100 hundred heavily tattooed people and 11 of Vancouver's best photographers came together for The Tattoo Project:  Body. Art. Image:  a three-day event at the Vancouver Photo Workshops described as "a synthesis of portraiture and tattoo art that poses the eternal question, Who am I?"  The body of work born from the project explores tattooed bodies via diverse photographic philosophies. Vince Hemingson, creator of The Tattoo Project (as well as many other wonderful projects), has said that the images not only reflect who the subjects are but also the photographers, from their differing approaches to lighting, mood, and color to different methods for engaging the subjects. The subjects were quite diverse themselves and not just today's standard "tattoo model" fare. 

Vince explains his inspiration behind The Tattoo Project: body. art. image.:
This project was an idea that I had simmering on the back burner for nearly fifteen years.  I have always wanted to to see how fine art photographers would interpret individuals who were tattooed. When I first saw Albert Watson's seminal work from the Louisiana Prisons in his book CYCLOPS it was an idea that wouldn't go away.   In my writing and filmmaking, I have always thought that the purpose of training your pen or your camera on a subject was illumination.  Literally to shine a light on something. 

In fifteen years of researching the history and social significance of tattooing - in dozens of different cultures around the world - I was struck by the extraordinary power that tattoos can have to reveal a person's inner self.  Rarely is the choice of a tattoo or a tattoo symbol an accident.  People choose tattoos that resonate with their sense of perceived identity of a deep level.  I was quoted in an interview nearly ten years ago, saying that, "Beauty is skin deep, but a tattoo goes all the way to the bone". And by that I meant that a tattoo can have profound meaning, far beyond mere decoration for many people.  A tattoo reveals character.  I wanted my photographs to be portraits, but I also wanted them to be about illuminating identity.  I can focus my camera on an individual and capture some aspect of the external self.  But I think their tattoo illuminates an aspect of their internal self, often times far more than they realize.  The idea that you could capture parts of both the external self and the inner self fascinates me. 

I wanted to exhibit my images as transparencies on light-boxes because I wanted the tattoos I photographed to be illuminated from within.  If the body is a temple, then the tattoos are stain-glass windows. Tattoos tell stories.  I want my images to record those stories.
From that long weekend, almost 200 images were selected for The Tattoo Project exhibition in November 2010, curated by Pennylane Shen, and shown at Performance Works on Granville Island. More than 750 people attended the opening night. With such incredible success, naturally, the next step was a book.

The 240-page hardcover The Tattoo Project: body. art. image., published by Schiffer Books, takes the very best works from the project and highlights them in a large-format, beautifully designed coffee table book. This book isn't just about pretty tattoos -- although there are a number of exceptional ones. What makes it engaging is the storytelling of these portraits, the way the personalities of these tattooed people shine through. And also, as Vince mentioned, it's interesting to see how these stories are told in so many ways, whether it be through the black & white long exposure photos by Marc Koegel or the "housewife cheescake" images by Melanie Jane. The other photographers include Wayne A. Hoecherl , Dan Kozma , Spencer Kovats, Syx Langemann, Aura McKayRosamond Norbury, Johnathon Vaughn, Jeff Weddell as well as Vince.   

Spencer_Kovats_The_Tattoo_Project.jpgImages above by Spencer Kovats.

The next step for Tattoo Project: body. art. image. is a documentary film. Throughout the project, two film crews captured the process -- as Vince says, they "prowled the crowded hallways, eves-dropped on photographers  as they shot in the studios, and interviewed dozens of models and all of the photographers."  This summer, Vince and his team will be launching a Kickstarter.com crowd funding campaign to help finish the post-production on the film.

Check The Vanishing Tattoo blog for updates on the film (and the perks for contributing) and other tattoo goodness.
  
Syx_Langemann_The_Tattoo_Project.jpgPortrait above by Syx Langemann.
Jan201424
08:56 AM
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mark_leaver_voodoo.jpgFacial tattoos provoke a reaction -- reactions that span awe, fear, loathing, excitement ... Personally, I've seen such beautiful facial tattooing, particularly on people who are my friends, that I find them just as artful as any decoration on the body.

Capturing the beauty of this work is Mark Leaver's Facial Tattoo project.The third-year commercial photography student at Arts University Bournemouth in England was recently profiled in Huck Magazine. [The article is offline line at this time of this post.]

In his profile, he offered this on the project:

What makes facial tattoos so distinctive is that they are still confrontational, there's no hiding them. There are only a select few people who make that kind of commitment and it was those people that I wanted to meet and photograph.
[...]
Unsurprisingly, the stereotypes were all very dated... if they were ever true at all.
See more of Mark's work on his site and Facebook page.
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Top photo of Xed LeHead tattooing Iestyn at Divine Canvas, and portrait of tattoo artist Touka Voodoo.
Dec201313
12:56 PM

In The Guardian today is feature called "Painted Ladies: Why women get tattoos." Normally, I find these types of articles banal, or even cringe worthy, for perpetuating cliches or not offering a broad spectrum of experience from our community. And so I was happily surprised to find many different voices of tattooed women in this article.

While there need not be any great miraculous reason to get tattooed, tattoos do come with a story, from an impulse to get a quick piece of historic flash to a full body project. I found the profiles of these women to be really interesting, and they made me think on the commonaIities and differences of our experiences with tattoos.

I particularly loved reading about Juanita Carberry, a merchant navy steward, who died in July at age 88. Here's a bit from her story:

The daughter of a renegade Irish peer, Carberry lived an extraordinarily full life. Her childhood in Kenya was difficult: her mother, a well-known aviator, died when she was three, and Carberry was often beaten by her governess. As a teenager, she was a key witness in a celebrated murder case, the 1941 shooting of the 22nd Earl of Erroll, and at 17 she joined the first aid nursing yeomanry in the Women's Territorials during the second world war. In 1946, Carberry became one of a handful of women to join the merchant navy, remaining for 17 years. It was during this period, says photographer Christina Theisen, that she started acquiring tattoos. Her first was a small spider on the sole of her foot; it didn't hurt, Theisen recalls Carberry saying, because the skin on her feet was so tough from walking barefoot as a child.

Read more here.

It is the work of Christina Theisen and Eleni Stefanou that really makes this piece so engaging. Theisen and Stefanou are behind womenwithtattoos.co.uk, a photo and film endeavor that pays respect to all tattooed women. They offer this on their work: "Our project seeks to capture the personal and the individual, embracing each woman and her tattoos as one, rather than isolating or magnifying the inked parts of her body. At the same time, by using natural environments and the context of urban Western culture, we intentionally move away from the sexualised glamour model aesthetic that dominates tattoo magazines and popular culture."

Two words: Hell. Yeah. 

My regret is that I wasn't aware of the project when it first rolled out. I will continue to follow Theisen and Stefanou's work, and I hope that more media outlets also follow their lead in telling compelling stories without the usual pop culture hype and flash so prevalent today.

Sep201330
02:58 PM
London Tattoo Convention.jpgLondon Tattoo Convention3.jpgBefore I post my redux tomorrow from this weekend's London Tattoo Convention, I wanted to share these fantastic photos by London-based photographer Edo Zollo. Edo's work focuses on street life and events, so he was perfectly suited to capture the excitement of the convention.

See more of Edo's images from on Flickr. You can check him on Twitter & Facebook.

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Jun201327
09:04 AM
the locust flyer A.jpgNext Sunday, July 7th, is the opening of Atom Moore's photographic exhibition "The Locust" at Sacred Gallery in SoHo NYC. It's a very personal exhibit in which Atom's photos tell a story of his friendship with a well known and beloved member of the body modification community, Adam Aries, and honors Adam's life, which was cut too short in 2011. Here's more info on the show from Sacred:

Atom Moore began photographing Adam Aries, also known as Zid, a decade ago. Zid was in many ways larger than life. His interests were not mainstream and he challenged many social norms. His gritty but beautiful look matched his straightforward attitude toward the world. Zid embodied the definition of living life the way you see fit.

Zid passed away unexpectedly in his sleep on March 22nd, 2011. In the wake of this tragedy, Atom has compiled a body of work from throughout their years making photographs together.

While Zid is no longer alive, his vivid spirit remains, both in these photographs and in the hearts and minds of the people who knew him. His unusual life touched many people, including his loving parents, who chose to remember him by getting a replica of his iconic locust tattoo. Atom is proud to share the unique and beautiful spirit of Zid through his photographs.
Exhibition runs from July 7th - 31st. Hope to see you there and celebrate a life fully lived.
Apr201327
12:27 PM
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On the Facebook page of the wonderful Loretta Leu, matriarch of the renowned Leu Family's Family Iron, I began seeing fantastic portraits of the Leu's and other artists as well as photography from events like the recent tattoo convention in Paris. So, I set out to find who was behind the lens of such engaging images so that I may share them with y'all.

The work is that of Switzerland-based photographer Bobby C. Alkabes. Bobby's work reflects an intimacy with her subjects, many of whom I know are not keen on having their photo taken but seem to be enjoying their shoot with her. She's also captured so many great moments in the tattoo world and beyond, which you can find in the Events section of her portfolio.

Bobby graciously permitted me to use these images above, including the action shot of a collabortive tattoo between Kurt Wiscombe & Filip Leu, shown above. Check more of her work on Facebook & on her site, where many of her prints are available for purchase.
Oct201211
07:55 AM
craig_burton_photography.jpg craig_burton.jpg craig_burton_photography2.jpgOne of my favorite photographers who works heavily with those in the tattoo and music worlds -- and is a walking work of art himself -- is London-based badass Craig Burton. Craig has shot me and numerous other collectors for my own books and contributes to Total Tattoo, Tattoo Life and Inked Magazine, among many others.

To check his work online, the best place for a daily pic fix is his newish blog, which I'm loving. There's a diversity of editorial and fashion -- from portraits of beautiful men & women, often covered in beautiful tattoo work, to convention coverage.
 
He also posts fun videos. Here's one below on the London Convention.
 

To contact Craig to shoot your model portfolio, live gig, art show, corporate function, or 20-lb tattoo tome, hit him up at info [at] craigburtonphotography.com.
Oct201202
10:39 AM
London tattoos convention 2012 - 1.jpgPhoto of Khan by Edo Zollo. All photos in this post by Edo.

This past weekend, one of the world's best tattoo shows -- The London Tattoo Convention -- welcomed an estimated 20,000 attendees to East London's Tobacco Docks for the finest tattooing, performances, art exhibitions ... and Instagram posting.

I'm not gonna lie. I wanted to delete all my social media apps out of jealousy. We couldn't make it to the party this year but were constantly reminded what we were missing. But I'm over the envy and now enjoying the many images of the show.

My favorite photos are by London-based photographer Edo Zollo, who has graciously let us share some of them here. You can see Edo's full convention set on Flickr. Also check him on Twitter, Facebook and Tumblr.

London Tattoo Convention Zollo.jpgLondon tattoos convention Edo Zollo.jpgFor more convention photos, follow these links:

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Jan201205
11:49 AM
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I like to think of myself as a bit of a Brooklyn badass ... but then there are things that bring me back to reality. The embodiment of badassery in my borough can be seen in this fascinating slideshow on Flavorwire of a gang "of 'troubled teenagers coming of age' in 1959 Brooklyn." Legendary photographer Bruce Davidson captured these kids getting into fights, making out with tough looking girls, and naturally, getting tattooed (as shown above). It's all very sexy. Hit up Flavorwire for more photos.
Dec201109
05:32 PM
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One of the most common questions tattooed people get on a regular basis is: "What does it mean?" There's an assumption that some momentous event must occur to inspire those who permanently mark themselves. For many, it is hard to understand tattoos as "art for art's sake."

With this in mind, I was pretty thrilled when I opened up Alex MacNaughton's new  "London Tattoos" book, and read this in the very first portrait profile, which is of 43-year-old Alice Temple:

My tattoos don't mean anything to me other than I like being covered in tattoos. It's a purely visual thing. I like the look of almost anyone who is covered, and I knew I wanted the same. What I have on me is almost irrelevant. What is important is the artist who works on me.
Alice's story is her lack of a story. It may not make for good reality TV but it's a great way to start a beautiful photography book where the subjects reflect on their tattoos and tattoo artists. Indeed, it is the props to the artists -- where the tattoos featured are specifically credited to each tattooist -- that makes London Tattoos  more than just pretty pictures and personal musings. You may actually fall in love with a tattooist's work based on what you find in these pages. [Alice's primary work was done by Nikole Lowe, which she further explains.]

But I really do dig the pretty pictures and reflections of the collectors. In these reflections, there are some compelling narratives behind the tattoos, answering the "what does it mean" question for those unsatisfied with the "because I like it" response. One of my favorites is that of Professor Richard Sawdon Smith, head of the Art and Media Department at London South Bank University. [A part of his spread is shown below.] Here's an excerpt from his story:

My tattoo is a very personal project made public. It speaks of living with a long-term incurable illness that requires regular blood tests on a tri-monthly cycle for the last 16 years, making the visible the internal and highlighting this regular routine.

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If you're not a big reader, the photographs are sure to hold your attention. The award-winning photographer -- who has authored three street art books -- offers intimate close-ups of the tattoo work that accompany the portraits. See more in this gallery. But Alex states that his goal is not to have a book simply showing tattoos:  "I want to show how tattoos are a reflection of a person's character and lifestyle, how to live with them and how tattoos can enhance confidence and success in life." Right on!

Extra bonus:  The foreword is written by our tattoo history guru, Dr. Matt Lodder, who also takes off his clothes in the latter portion of the book.

You can purchase the 304-page paperback from Amazon.co.uk or Amazon.com in the US.

BUT before you do, enter to win a free copy! The Prestel Publishing sent us a copy for one lucky reader. As usual, the winner will be selected randomly from those who comment on this post in our Needles & Sins Syndicate Group on Facebook or who Tweet at me. In one week, December 16, we'll put all the names of the commenters/tweeters into Randomized.com and the internet gods will offer up the chosen ones.

Good luck!

UPDATE: It seems the fabulous Dr. Lodder is offering a copy of his own to a reader in the UK. So when you comment in Facebook or on Twitter, let us know if you're in the UK.
Nov201102
06:45 PM
sailor-jerry-tattoos-voodoo-56.jpgOne of our favorite guerrilla photographers, Igor of Driven By Boredom, was in New Orleans at the Voodoo Music Experience last weekend where he hooked up with the fine Sailor Jerry folks and photographed the insanity inside their killer vintage airstream.

There, tattooist Terry Brown worked for three days putting on free Sailor Jerry-inspired tattoos on rock stars, crew members and Igor himself. One such rock star was Jesse Hughes of Boots Electric (shown below) who got a Fuse logo tattoo, old school styled. For more on the fun (with more pics), check Igor's blog.

The Sailor Jerry airstream heads to the Fun Fun Fun Fest in Austin this weekend, where Terry will be doing more free Americana tattoos. More on their Facebook events page.

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For NY area punk fans:  Igor also fronts the punk cover band, F*ucking Bullshit, which includes our Brian Grosz on bass. Next Thursday, November 10th, the band will be playing Lit Lounge in the East Village, NYC  at 11PM. Hope to smash faces with you there.


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Nov201101
02:21 PM
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Continuing our posts on noted upcoming events, on the East Coast, Sacred Gallery in NYC presents "Immortal Until Death: The Cemetery Landscapes and Portrait Photography of Nathaniel C. Shannon." The show opens this Saturday, Nov. 5th, and runs until Nov. 27th. The opening reception is Saturday from 7-10 PM. More info on Facebook

Like the Idexa Stern and Aurora Meneghello collaboration, Nathaniel has documented the work of a renowned tattooist -- the godfather of neo-tribal tattooing Leo Zuluetta -- and his images are also featured in "Tattoo World" and my first book "Black Tattoo Art." But in this exhibition at Sacred, his photos from cemeteries are the focus of the show. Here's more background on this series:

As a child, each Memorial Day my parents and I would visit the graves of our ancestors at various cemeteries in Michigan. I always enjoyed these trips. They connected us as a family, helped me better understand my family history and provided perspective on who I am today.

Over the years, I became fascinated with cemeteries: the intricate architecture of mausoleums and headstone designs, the landscaping of the grounds and the expression of legacy present with each burial plot. As I grew older, I would frequent the cemeteries of Ypsilanti, MI, where I was raised, and wander aimlessly by myself for hours, enjoying the solitude, studying the tombstones and the names etched into them, creating stories about the dead.

Visiting cemeteries became a peaceful escape from the stresses of the living world, the cemetery gates serving as a portal to history. Naturally, as my addiction to photography grew, I brought my camera through that portal with me.

Because the photography of cemeteries is a very spiritual process for me, I prefer to be alone while I shoot. If the living are nearby, the tombs can't find me. I follow a personal code of ethics in these places, one that I choose not to share with others. The cemetery is not my home, it's the home of the dead. I respect the dead and am drawn to the energy of specific graves. When a grave does not want to be photographed, one way or another, its inhabitant lets me know.

My goal is to portray of these headstones in the same way I do the living: as a vital element of their position in space and time. After all, we are all suspects.

See more of Nathaniel's work on his website and blog. Hope to see you at the exhibit!

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Nov201101
01:52 PM
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For my San Francisco treats:  this Sunday, November 6th, an event celebrating the collaboration of tattooist Idexa Stern and photographer Aurora Meneghello will take place at Idexa's Black & Blue Tattoo, 381 Guerrero at 16th, from 6-9PM. More details on Facebook.

Aurora's beautiful portraits of Idexa's tattoo clients are featured in the hardcover I edited for Abrams Books, "Tattoo World," which will be available for purchase as well as prints of the images. A number of those portraits will be on display at the event. Here's some background on their collaboration:

Idexa and Aurora shared a common vision for this project and together decided to approach Idexa's tattoos in a different way than traditional tattoo photography. Idexa specifically asked Aurora to work on this project because of her love of the natural landscape and her experience photographing people. Aurora brings a different aesthetics to the genre, one that captures Idexa's original style which is rooted in the body of her clients. Idexa and Aurora share a love of collaboration and community and brought their values to this common project.

Idexa's work is inspired by shapes and forms found in urban and natural spaces. Just as tattoos become part of a person's body, so people are part of our environment. These photographs were taken outside, on Bernal Hill in San Francisco and At Helen Putnam Park in Petaluma, to free the artists from the constrains of traditional studio photography. The tattoos were given light and breath to shine on the skin.
Read more about it and see more photos on Aurora's blog.

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Oct201126
01:19 PM


We've seen a few stop motion videos of tattooing, but we're particularly digging this one by Portland photographer Dabe Alan of his camera-themed tattoo by Tony Touch at Infinite Art Tattoo in Toledo, Ohio.

Through stop motion, you really get an up-close look into technique and overall creation of the tattoo. As Dabe notes in the description under Part 1 of the video, the sitting took four hours and will be part of a large work. He explains: "So with the help of Tony Touch, I am getting an awesome Nerd sleeve worked on whenever I go visit Toledo. We decided to roll with an evolution of cameras at first, then more nerdy references above." Also check Part 2 and Part 3.

Here is part of the tattoo below from Tony's Facebook page, where you can also find updates to his portfolio.

Thanks to photographer Atom Moore for the link!

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Sep201126
03:27 PM
London_Tattoo_Convention_Ed_London_Photo.jpgOnce again, the London Tattoo Convention brought in the modified masses this weekend -- an estimated 20,000 people -- with the draw of renowned tattooists from across the globe, fine art galleries, fire-breathing beauties, bands, and plenty of pints. While we didn't make it this year, we followed dispatches on Facebook & Twitter as well as on Flickr, which has many fabulous photos from the show, including this one above by Ed London Photography. [Links to more photo sets are below.]

And like every year, the press swarmed the Tobacco Docks to bring the freak show into the homes of the unblemished. Some are particularly noteworthy in their approach to covering tattoo culture.

First, in a lead-up to the show, TNT Magazine profiled London-based artists, Mo Copoletta of The Family Business and Nikole Lowe of Good Times Tattoo.The article begins with the outrageous statement that even doctors and lawyers get tattooed (heaven forfend!), but then has the artists carry the piece with their thoughts on tattooing, such as the trend of young people getting neck tattoos without much other coverage. It's a controversial topic among tattooists, and here's what Mo had to say about it:
I believe it's more of a cool factor of belonging to a scene rather than a mature decision of having something on your neck. [...] Before going to neck and hands, you need to live with tattoos and have visible parts of your body, like forearms and legs, done first to be able to get used to people's reactions. Because, no matter what, you're always going to get a reaction from people, and you're not going to be 20 forever and looking rock'n'roll your whole life.
Mo and Nikole also offer general tattoo advice for those new to the art. Worth a read.

The BBC covered the show as well with a particular bent on tattoo regret. I was immediately put off by the usual tired line: "Tattoos are no longer the trophies of rockers, sailors, bikers, bohemians and criminals, they have gone mainstream." [It's also used in the next linked article.] Dr. Matt Lodder found a line in a 1926 Vanity Fair article declaring that tattoos were no longer just for sailors, but have "percolated through the entire social stratum." So please, reporters, cut out the cliches. Then the BBC reporter goes on to ponder whether there would be less tattoo regret if people could "test drive" a tattoo, so she gets a temporary tattoo and goes to the convention to see what the reaction to it is. People winced. Rightly so. At least the focus of the writing was on those who do not regret their tattoo choices like Joe Monroe, Cammy Stewart & Lestyn Flye of Divine Canvas. They are shown in a short video of the show embedded in the online article.


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My favorite reportage is The Guardian's "Tattoos: Eyecatching But Art They Art?" by art critic Jonathan Jones. Again, there was "Once associated with sailors, gang members, or circus performers, these markings are now a mainstream cultural force." I too winced. But the rest of the writing makes up for it. Here's a taste:

It is the weight of ritual, the sense of undergoing something that changes you, that stops me personally from ever considering a tattoo. But it must also be part of its attraction. Just by visiting a tattooist such as the celebrated Danish artist Eckel you can change who you are. The change is permanent. You are a work of art.

In the Pacific, anthropologists have associated tattoos with a fragmented conception of identity, a belief that a person is not one but many things. Putting on the shining painted skin of a warrior changes your nature.

Are people now seeking to change their natures, to become fabulous new beings? Perhaps there is something digital and post-human about it all, a new sense of self that is no longer bounded by being inside your own skin, but penetrated - as by a needle - by social media and constant internet information, so you feel part of a larger entity, that imprints itself on your body.

For less talk and more imagery, check the Flickr sets of these photographers:

* Ed London Photography (First image above)

* Rhodri Jones/Rodrico (Image of Jo Harrison tattooing above and facial tattoo below).

* Wild Orchid

* Solamore

London Tattoo Convention 06.jpg

Jul201118
02:29 PM
1-by Julien Lachaussée.jpg
Parisian photographer, Julien Lachaussee, spent six years shooting tattoo artists and collectors from all walks of life, and the result of his work is now culminating in a limited edition art book entitled Alive: Tattoo Portraits published by Editions Eyrolles.

Alive is comprised of 146 portraits in color and black & white, and in Polaroid and analog photography. Subjects include body builders, strippers and a number of tattoo artists including Laura Satana, Lea Nahon, and Tin Tin (shown below) who also wrote the foreword.

Julien and Eyrolles have launched a pre-sale special of the book on Ulule. Those who order the book on Ulule within the next 19 days will receive Alive (in its designer box) and a signed and numbered print. Fund raising through Ulule will go towards offsetting the printing costs, but the goal of 45 sales must be met.

You can pre-order Alive for 160 Euros for its November release date. Also find more of Julien's work in Sang Bleu and Inked magazines among others.

Tin Tin by Julien Lachaussée.jpg
10 - by Julien Lachaussée.jpg
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EDITOR IN CHIEF:
Marisa Kakoulas
CONTRIBUTORS:
Miguel Collins
Craig Dershowitz
Brian Grosz
Sean Risley
Patrick Sullivan
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