Results tagged “Rose Hardy”

12:06 PM
Rose Hardy Tattooweb.jpg
Rose Hardy tattoo above.

Todd Noble tattooweb.jpg
Todd Noble tattooing.

Pagoda City Tattoo web.jpeg
Joe Capobianco & co-organizer Justin Weatherholtz at the Kings Avenue Tattoo booth.

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Dream team Heather Bailey, Rose Hardy & Virginia Elwood judge the Saturday tattoo competition.

After back-to-back NYC tattoo shows, I was feeling a bit burnt out on conventions and figured I'd take a break this summer. I had a blast at those shows, of course, but big conventions can be intense with the crowds, cameras, competitions and general creative chaos. But after writing my post on the Pagoda City Tattoo Fest, I decided to drive down to Wyomissing, Pennsylvania this past weekend to check for myself what my friends had been talking up since last year's premier of the convention.

On the way there, I passed by billboards that promised damnation for abortion, special deals on rifles, and mega-mall retail therapy. And then there was the Pagoda City Tattoo Fest billboard--a good sign, literally, that all would be welcome to the party.

Just minutes after walking into the Crown Plaza lobby, filled with banners for the fest, I got hugs from friends who also traveled to be a part of it. At check-in, hotel employees were wearing the super-cool designed convention tees, just one of the many ways the hotel welcomed the tattoo take-over.

I dropped my bag off and headed to the convention area of the hotel, where I was warmly greeted by
Joe Johns and, soon after, Justin Weatherholtz, co-organizers and well respected tattooers. This was a hands-on operation, not run by an outside convention company, but by tattoo artists for tattoo artists and collectors.

The Pagoda City Tattoo Fest is a small boutique show with very select tattoo artists of the world's best. As I walked up and down the aisles, I kept thinking as I passed by the shop booths, "Woah, she's here, he's Wyomissing?" [The amount of talent is too much to name. You can check the artist list here.] And so many of them -- who have endless studio waiting lists -- were taking walk-ups. I wondered if those who just came in off the street knew how lucky they were.

While the focus was heavily on excellent tattooing, I also felt the strength of the show stemmed from the intimate community feel. I didn't just get to hang out with old friends; the way it was set up, with a great outdoor communal space by the pool and laid back vibe, I had the opportunity to meet new people, have a drink and share stories. It wasn't a bunch of posing tattoo models or reality TV tattooists holding court with fans. People were really connecting
. It was ... lovely.

That's not to say there wasn't some hardcore partying and 3am splashing in the pool. Dirty jokes, dirty laughs, & dirty tattoo tales will always be my favorite part of shows. [I never get tired of hearing veteran tattooer Mike Skiver keep telling the story of how he mistook my butt for his wife's at a convention 14 years ago -- a grab that began our friendship.] Sex, whiskey and rock-n-roll will never leave conventions (even if I, myself, went to bed sober at a reasonable hour).

Because I was having too much fun, I didn't take many pics, but you can see a few on my Instagram and Flickr album. Find more on the
Pagoda City Tattoo Fest Instagram.

Claudia De Sabe tattooweb.jpgClaudia De Sabe tattoo.

Zach Dunn painting web.jpgZack Dunn painting.

Me and Mike Skiverweb.jpgBooty out with Mike Skiver.

08:00 AM
Rose Hardy

claudia-de-sabe-big-1.jpgClaudia De Sabe

UPDATE:  In just a little more that a month, the fine art exhibit "Time: Tattoo Art Today," on view at Somerset House in London, will close on October 5. Our friend Serinde recently visited the show and sent photos, which we've posted to our Flickr stream. Serinde described the show as "surprising, striking, and above all extremely well executed." If you plan on attending the wonderful London Tattoo Convention, make sure to put this exhibit on your must see list while you're there.

Garnering rave reviews in London, "Time: Tattoo Art Today" presents the fine art of 70 some of our finest tattooers around the globe, including Filip Leu, Ed Hardy, Horiyoshi III, Paul Booth, Guy Aitchison, Kore Flatmo, Rose Hardy, Mister Cartoon, Chuey Quintanar, Volker Merschky and Simone Pfaff, among other artists. "Time" opened at Somerset House in London last week, and drew a great deal of media attention, highlighting just how skilled the artists in our community can be in mediums beyond skin. For a glimpse into the exhibit, the BBC offers this video.

Curated by tattoo artist Claudia De Sabe and publisher Miki Vialetto, the tattooers were asked to create a new work for the exhibition on the theme of time. Here's more from Somerset:

The resulting collection ranges from oil painting, watercolours and traditional Japanese silk painting to paint layering on real skulls, airbrush and bronze sculpture. Time and all it infers (such as life and death) is a classic, common motif in tattoo art, expressed through a vast variety of iconographic combinations. For example, the popular inkings of butterflies, blossoms and the handled cross signify life, while memento moris such as skulls or the goddess Kali denote death. Many of these symbols are also present in the original pieces displayed.
See more works from the exhibit on the museum's site and on Miki's Tattoo Life site.

"Time: Tattoo Art Today" will be on view at Somerset House until October 5, 2014. All artworks on display, as well as the show's catalog, prints and other memorabilia, are available to purchase at the Rizzoli Bookshop.

Horiyoshi-III.jpgHoriyoshi III
filip-leu-big.jpgFilip Leu
06:15 PM
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I figured I'd drop a shopping post on you today: Tattooed Steel jewlery and accessories.

While I'm hesitant to promote anything featured on the cheez that was Rock of Love Bus, there are some tattoo artists behind the outfit like Rose Hardy, who designed the work above, and whose tattoo work can also be found on her Tattooed Steel page. So I'm giving it a shout and you can decide if you're hot for it or not.

[And yes, Brian, I know your Rock of Love and Daisy of Love voiceovers pay for our drinks but that doesn't mean I gotta love watching the tattooed folks on the show fulfill every stereotype.]

I've never been a fan of the military tags as a fashion thing, but I could dig the brushed belt buckles, like this one by Kris Fry, if the price was lower. The bullet ring is also kinda hot, but I imagine Che would revolt over his image being used to hawk counterculture for companies.


Honestly, in these times, I'm really not shopping; hence, the limited shopping posts. But I have bought a BeDazzler to create my own line of high-end fashion (which you can see Brian model here). It's an indie DIY thang that would make Che proud. Prices for my couture bedazzle line begin at $500. Crooked lettering that falls under the armpit is extra. 
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