Results tagged “The Selvedge Yard”

Oct201219
06:43 PM
new yorker tattoo romney.jpg
While it's not even out on newsstands yet, the "Skin Deep" cover by Barry Blitt for next week's The New Yorker magazine is getting tons of buzz. The image is a play on Norman Rockwell's classic painting, The Tattoo Artist (1944). The traditional sailor flash background is replaced with tongue-in-cheek critiques of Mitt Romney; for example, the pin-up is styled as a "Binder of Babes," and the classic schooner tattoo reads "Cayman or Bust." And of course, Blitt has fun by taking the crossed-out names of the sailor's old girlfriends and changing them to political positions. [If this was a Bill Clinton satire, I'm sure the girls' names would've stayed.]

For some history on the original painting, check the Tattoo Archive's page on Norman Rockwell, which offers insight into the work, including the following info:

Rockwell worked from various photographs while painting The Tattooist, which was used as The Post cover on the March 4, 1944 issue. In fact, Rockwell used photographs as an aid in doing most of his paintings. For The Tattooist, Rockwell borrowed a tattoo machine from the Bowery tattooist Al Neville. Tattoo shop signs seen here is from the Rockwell collection. Rockwell obviously consulted with Al Neville along with former sailors to insure accuracy in his painting of The Tattooist.
The Selvedge Yard also has a great post on the painting, with photos like the one below.

norman-rockwell-the-tattooist.jpg
May201011
10:24 AM
Japanese Tattoo historic.jpg
Our go-to source for historic photos, including but not limited to tattoos, is The Selvedge Yard. What's particularly cool about the site is that editor JP also puts the images in context with interesting background info.

Our most recent fave, which Pat dug up, is this post on Japanese tattooing in the 40s called:
Ancient Art of the Japanese Tebori Tattoo Masters: Ink in Harmony.

Images include the one above of "A group of traditionally tattooed gamblers," hand-tattooing (tebori) on women, and preserved tattooed skins, among other beautiful photos. They illustrate the words of legendary Japanese master Horihide, which were taken (in their entirety) from his personal story told on Tattoos.com. Here's a taste of that story:

When I was an apprentice, feudal customs still existed in Japan. The apprenticeship was one of the feudal customs called uchideshi in Japanese. Normally, pupils lived with their masters, and were trained for 5 years. After 5-year training, the pupils worked independently, and gave the masters money that he earned for one year. The one-year service was called oreiboko in Japanese, the service to express the gratitude towards the masters. The masters usually told new pupils about this system, 5-year-training and 1-year service, when they began the apprenticeship.
[...]
Today's young people never understand how tough the training was. Sometimes the master yelled at me and even hit me. To endure such treatment needs patience. Because of such unreasonable treatment, most pupils gave up and ran away from the master. Of course, I often wondered why he hit us. Although I had anger towards the master, I could not talk back. All I could do in the feudal period was to obey what the master said. I was so frustrated that I cried in bed so many times. The master sometimes slapped me without any reason. However, I found the master purposely hit me and forced me to do overwork for my mental training after I became a tattooist later on. I hated him so much during the apprenticeship. Looking back now, I am ashamed of having had such feelings towards my master.

[I chose this particular quote to shut up whiny tattoo apprentices today who think they have it so rough.]

For much more of Horihide's stories on Japanese tattooing--from apprenticeships to traditional designs to the tebori technique to tattoo thieves--go to the original article on Tattoos.com.

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Our past posts on The Selvedge Yard:

Nov200903
02:55 PM
Skuse Schiefley tattoo.jpg
The Selvedge Yard blog -- whom we've link loved before -- has a fabulous array of vintage photos in today's post: "BTC Bristol Tattoo Club: The Skuse Family, Generations of Killer Ink."

The post offers historic info along with the many photos of the legendary tattoo family, whose studio, Les Skuse Tattoo, still operates in Keynsham, Bristol. You can read more about the Skuses's 80+ years in tattooing here and here (check the lip tattoo pic!).

Here's my favorite quote from Les (which we should all heed today):

"I have always been ready and willing to learn, never thinking I knew it all and continually searching for ways in which to improve my work and equipment. It is my firm belief that the more tattooists meet, correspond and exchange ideas, the better it will be both for the individual and the profession."

Thanks to Matt, Jake, and Rafe for the link!

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UPDATE: The Lizardman just reminded me that many of these images can be found in Taschen's 1000 Tattoos book.
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EDITOR IN CHIEF:
Marisa Kakoulas
CONTRIBUTORS:
Miguel Collins
Craig Dershowitz
Brian Grosz
Sean Risley
Patrick Sullivan
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