Results tagged “Total Tattoo”

Sep201415
02:32 PM
total tattoo issue.jpg

In the latest edition of the UK's Total Tattoo Magazine -- its 10-year anniversary issue -- you'll find what the magazine graciously calls my "words of wisdom," although a truer description would be, "Here's a page of Marisa blathering on about something she doesn't like." 

For this column, editor James Sandercock asked me to write further on the Daily Mail's crush on me, as I noted in my World's Worst Tattoo Reporting post. In that post, I talked about "The Fail" using my photo in a ridiculous article about how "middle class" people have tattoos. But it wasn't the first time a pic of me was featured. In my piece for Total Tattoo, I talk about how the tabloid has banked off my bod before.

Here's a taste:

If Andy Warhol was correct that everyone will be world-famous for 15 minutes, then I'm pretty pissed off that The Daily Mail is eating up all my allotted time. Over the past year, the tabloid has featured a picture of me in all my heavily tattooed glory, not just once, but twice-and both times they were not kind. I could liken the The Fail to a jilted ex-boyfriend, obsessed and angry that I've dared to do anything to my appearance without permission. But it's really more insidious. What the tabloid does (and they are not alone) is lure people in with tattoo images--many of which are used without permission--then slap a catchy headline over some cheap and easy content, all the while, having McDonald's ads flash in the background. Breaking it down: my bod is being used to sell burgers. Not the acclaim I was hoping for.

The first time I became a Daily Mail darling (to my knowledge) was in September 2013, in which a photo of one of my tattoos was posted under the blaring headline "World's Worst Head Tattoos." "World's Worst" anything is common "clickbait," designed to drag us in, make us angry with asinine writing, and provoke us to comment on the article, defending something that is personal and important to us. It brings more clicks, more time on the site, and more interactivity. Editors and advertisers just love how much we hate it.

This tattoo of mine that has The Daily Mail readers clutching their collective pearls in horror is indeed on the back of my head; however, it's deserving of praise rather than any pejorative. As the kids say, my head tattoo is "pretty fucking rad." Sometime around 2005, I wanted a fun, illustrative, semi-secret tattoo that was quite different from the blackwork ornamental bodysuit that I've been working on. So, I made an appointment with renowned tattooer Tim Kern, who is pretty fucking rad himself, and we came up with the idea to do a devilish looking little girl with red pigtails popping out of the back of my skull with a chain in her hand; essentially, a portrait of my childhood with added weaponry. I had taken some time off from the law firm I was working for at that time, so it was a perfect moment to shave off some ginger curls and get a badass tattoo that would eventually be covered when my hair grew out and I had to be proper lawyer again.

I was so happy with my new tattoo that I posted it to my photo album on Flickr.com (this was pre-Instagram days). I wanted to share the artwork. I did not want it used by others for their ridiculous "listicles," which lure people with short attention spans and a propensity to make comments that they would never dare to say to someone's face.[...]

It's also important to note here that Flickr has a better photo-sharing policy that other sites like Facebook, Twitter/Twitpic and Instagram. When you upload an image to Flickr, the default setting is "All rights reserved," putting others on notice that you're holding on to the rights granted to you in copyright law and not giving them up for sites like Break.com to use. Flickr's policy specifies that they may use, distribute, display, reproduce, modify, and adapt your content on the Yahoo! Services but "solely for the purpose for which such content was submitted or made available." For Facebook and Instagram, when you post your photos and videos, you are granting these sites "a non-exclusive, fully paid and royalty-free, transferable, sub-licensable, worldwide license..." That means that they can use your content and offer it to others without your approval, and even make some money off of it without anything paid to you.

Read the full article in the 10th Anniversary issue of Total Tattoo, which can be purchased at booksellers throughout the UK, US, and around the world. You can also download the digital version.

There are also great reads in the issue, such as the artist interviews with legend Horiyoshi III as well as Marco Galdo and Max Pniewski.  And giveaways, including my Black & Grey Tattoo box set!!  Grab the mag for more info.

marisa head tattoo480.jpgFreshly inked head tattoo by Tim Kern.

Apr201403
06:54 PM
kakoulas tattoo copyright.jpg
In the latest edition of the UK's Total Tattoo Magazine (May 2014), you'll find my "Who Owns Your Tattoo?" article, this time looking at the issue through the UK's Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988 (CDPA). The title may evoke thoughts of some dystopian universe where evil tattooist overlords dictate what people do with their bodies; however, the article is really about when tattoos are used for a purpose other than being worn proudly. It's not too long and touches on only basic points, but the goal is to get people thinking about these concepts.

I'm also not that familiar with the CDPA, so I contacted an expert, Catherine Jasserand, PhD researcher at the University of Groningen in The Netherlands, to ask her her thoughts on copyright as it relates to custom tattoo designs. I posed this question to her:   "If a customer comes to a tattoo studio with an idea but not a design, and the tattoo artist creates an original work for the customer and then tattoos it, who would own the design (if there is no agreement between them)? The artist? The client? Both of them?"

Catherine shared these thoughts for the article:

"An idea in itself is not protectable. If the client gives very vague instructions, then it is doubtful that he or she could be considered as a joint author. However, if client is contributing to the tattoo and decides on important elements such as the composition, shape and so on, I believe it could be argued that the client and tattoo artist could share authorship. In the end, what is important is to question the level of freedom that the tattoo artist has in the execution of the 'design' and which level of creativity is she using."
Jasserand also noted that, even if the client pays the tattoo artist, the payment does not mean that copyright on the tattoo is automatically transferred to the client. According to the Intellectual Property Office, the official government body responsible for granting Intellectual Property (IP) rights in the UK, "When you ask or commission another person or organisation to create a copyright work for you, the first legal owner of copyright is the person or organisation that created the work and not you the commissioner, unless you otherwise agree it in writing."

For the full article, pick up Total Tattoo (which you can also find on US newsstands) or download a digital copy.

Outside of the article, Catherine and I also chatted a bit about common copyright issues relating to tattoos on continental Europe, so hopefully I'll get to further explore that sometime soon.

For more on my writing on tattoo copyright in the US check these links:
Nov201213
06:29 PM
manwoman.jpg
I learned from Colin Dale this afternoon that ManWoman passed away peacefully this morning after a bout with terminal cancer.  Manny was an artist and poet but best known for his work reclaiming the "gentle swastika."  Manny was such a bright light, and while I'm saddened by the news, I also had to smile thinking of our brief time together and all the experiences he shared and giggles we had over them. He will be deeply missed by so many.

Shannon of BMEzine.com posted his tribute to ManWoman today and included this video below, in which Manny offers his "final thoughts" less than ten days ago. The whole video is beautiful but ends powerfully on these words:

Find the gift that is in you. You're in this world as a gift of god to this world, so get busy doing it!
I'm on it, Manny!

For more on his thoughts about art, spirituality and the swastika, I'm posting my Q&A with ManWoman, which took place at the Traditional Tattoo and World Culture Festival in Ireland in 2010, and was published in the October 2010 issue of the UK's Total Tattoo magazine. Find it below the video (after the jump).

RIP ManWoman.



Interview with ManWoman ...
CONTINUE READING....
Mar201201
10:28 AM
kristel oreto tattoo1.jpg
As March is National Women's History Month, we'll be doing even more profiles on female tattooers and collectors over the next few weeks.

To start it all off, it seems fitting that we profile the colorful Kristel Oreto as my feature on her for the UK's Total Tattoo is in the latest issue of the magazine (April 2012), and it also happens to be her first day working at Art Machine Productions in Philadelphia.

Here's a taste of the Total Tattoo article:

total tattoo oreto.jpgThere was a time when telling someone they "tattooed like a girl" would get you punched in the face. But Kristel Oreto unabashedly deems her portfolio "bubble girlie style," and has a clientele of both men and women who come to her for work that is sugar and spice, and occasionally, a death metal skull.

Much of her fan base need not travel far as Kristel is a fixture on the tattoo convention circuit but you can find her full time at Art Machine Productions in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, but she continues to tattoo, four times a year, at Crimson Anchor studio in New Port Richey, Florida, which is owned by her husband Joe Tattoo.


"Bubble girlie style" not only describes her tattoos, but her personality. "I'm a really girlie, over the top, bubbly person, so when people ask me to explain my work, it's just that: my style is me," says the 30-year-old native Floridian. "It's based off of New School--all my influences have come from New School--and things I love. I love filigree, old antique stuff and Hello Kitty. [...] I love the way the candy and cupcakes look. They are so happy and colorful. There's no way you can look at a cupcake or piece of candy and have a bad thought in your mind.


To read the entire piece, look for the issue at booksellers in Europe, USA, Canada, New Zealand and Australia. You can also purchase a copy online.

To see more of Kristel's work, check her online portfolio and Facebook page.

kristel oreto tattoo.jpgkristel oreto tattoo2.jpg
Sep201008
02:04 PM
Manny, Astarte at Irish Tattoo Festival.jpg
As I mentioned in July's redux of the Traditional Tattoo & World Culture Fest in Ireland, I had the pleasure of interviewing ManWoman, an artist who's mission it has been since the 1960s to reclaim the swastika from its Nazi taint back to its ancient, peaceful roots.

ManWoman, or Manny as his friends call him, used tattoos as a way to spread his message, and in doing so, found a loyal fan base in the tattoo community. In fact, many of those in attendance specifically came to hear ManWoman's presentation on his journey. Today, ManWoman is no longer adding to his tattoo collection but continues to inspire through other mediums like painting, writing and mixed media arts.

In our interview, ManWoman discusses everything from his spiritual awakening to the swatika's origins to meeting Holocaust survivors. You can read the full article in the October issue of Total Tattoo, now on newsstands and online. Here's a taste:

There are Holocaust survivors living today for whom the swastika could mean nothing else. Have you ever met anyone who was directly impacted by the Holocaust?

Yes, I have. About a year ago I was at a health spa in Glen Ivy, California where my men's group was having our big annual meeting. We were sitting in the hot springs with the water bubbling all around and all of a sudden this little bony hand comes over the railing, and this old, old lady who must've been close to ninety pointed at my arms and said, "They told us children we were going to a party when they put us in Auschwitz." And I thought, "Oh my god, how am I going to explain to this lady that what I'm doing has no connection at all?" She just went into this really sad place and I felt bad. What do you say to someone like her? I just told her that it didn't have anything to do with that. How do you tell someone in 25 words or less, in a two-minute encounter, about the incredible beauty and sacredness of this symbol? A symbol that is has been used by Hindus, Buddhists, Pagans and ancient cultures as the most sacred symbol of blessing and auspiciousness. I was in India last year, and you can't go anywhere there without seeing it. It's everywhere.

The symbol appears in many cultures throughout history. Why do you think it keeps appearing in so many different times and places?

It's because it's a part of the archetypes of the inner foundations of the mind. There are universal symbols; like Karl Yung said, "If you slice through every religion there are universal archetypes: death, rebirth, the sacred mother giving birth to the divine child. And guess what pours through my dreams night after night? It's the archetypes but totally free from any organized religion. I see my duty as an artist and poet to refresh these archetypes. They're not going to change but they need to come out in a new form that we can relate to differently. When I see all these young people taking the swastika and playing with it, dancing with it, and making it into what it really is, it's just amazing. I feel like crying because I'm so excited. I come here and there are all these guys with their heads shaved and swastika tattoos on their faces, and it's like my dream is coming true. I better be careful what I dream of!

You can purchase the Total Tattoo issue here. It also includes a great profile on tattoo artist Daniel DiMattia.
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EDITOR IN CHIEF:
Marisa Kakoulas
CONTRIBUTORS:
Miguel Collins
Craig Dershowitz
Brian Grosz
Sean Risley
Patrick Sullivan
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