Results tagged “exhibit”

Sep201409
03:08 PM
body-electric-tattoo.jpg1-Alex-Binnie-hand-hate.jpgArt work above by Alex Binnie.

On September 18th, the highly anticipated "Body Electric" exhibit at the Ricco Maresca gallery in NYC will open, featuring the fine art work of a stellar roster of tattooists, who include Saira Hunjan, Jef Palumbo, Duke Riley, Noon, Nazareno Tubaro, Amanda Wachob, Jacqueline Spoerle, Colin Dale, Scott Campbell, Peter Aurisch, Chuey Quintanar, Horiren First, Alex Binnie, Minka Sicklinger, David Hale, Stephanie Tamez, Virginia Elwood, and Yann Black.

The show is guest curated by the wonderful Margot Mifflin, author of Bodies of Subversion: A Secret History of Women and Tattoo (and my co-conspirator in recent lectures, including Women's Ink). In her essay, "Visionary Tattoo," Margot writes that "tattooing has sprung free in the new millennium, liberated by artists who combine fresh concepts, holistic design, and masterful technique in thrillingly original styles." It is this "new generation of conceptual trailblazers" whose work Margot and the Ricco Maresca gallery have chosen to display in "Body Electric." Margot further writes:

The visual art featured here reflects their tattoo sensibility--the next best thing to showcasing the living canvases that bear their designs. They hail from around the globe: In Lucerne, for example, Jacqueline Spoerle uses Swiss folk motifs in lyrical silhouettes perfectly suited to tattoo's inherently graphical nature. In Los Angeles, Chuey Quintanar takes fine line black and grey portraiture to a new level of grace and power. New Yorker Duke Riley's maritime narratives betray a blush of nostalgia through strong line work and meticulous cross-hatching. In Argentina, Nazareno Tubaro blends tribal, Op Art, and geometric patterns in flowing compositions that embrace and complement human musculature. And in Athens, Georgia, David Hale, a relative newcomer, folds the curvilinear lines of Haida art into his folk-inflected nature drawings.

The exhibition includes a selection of flash art spanning the late 19th to mid-20th century. These pieces, many by titans of the trade--George Burchett and Sailor Jerry Collins among them--represent the keystone style of Western tattoo tradition and the semiotic conventions that define it, from hearts and anchors to pinups and crucifixes. Conveying both the charms and limits of these pioneers, they offer a baseline for understanding the evolution of tattooing over the course of the past century.
I'm incredibly excited to attend on the 18th, not simply to view the works, but also to spend time with a number of the artists who will be arriving specifically for this exhibit. For one, Nazareno Tubaro of Argentina, one of my most favorite blackwork artists, will be at the show (and he'll also be a guest at Kings Avenue Tattoo NYC from 9-12 to 9-15). In addition to those artists whose work is on display, I hear many more will come to celebrate the opening. I hope you'll join us as well.

8-Horiren-First.jpgArt work above by Horiren First.

colin dale art.jpgArt work above by Colin Dale.

Aug201425
02:46 PM
king kong  jpg.jpgZeuss.jpg Creating a personal challenge, with the end goal of highlighting the possibilities of tattooing for a wide audience, Jeromey "Tilt" Mcculloch recently completed a 5-year-long project to create 100 backpiece paintings, largely rooted in traditional tattooing.

Tilt, who owns New Life Tattoos in Champaign, IL, would hang each painting on the wall of his shop as each piece was finished, which inspired clients to think about large scale tattoo art on their own bodies (such as one client who has begun his Kraken backpiece painting tattoo), or to incorporate elements of the larger pieces into other works.

In its entirety, Tilt's project is over 6 &1/2 feet tall by 32 feet wide when displayed together, an amalgam of the 100 15x20 back piece paintings. He's currently traveling to tattoo conventions to display the project as a whole, and is in the process of self-publishing a book on the paintings. [Tilt is also the author of Classic Flash Vols. 1 and 2.]

Jeromey Mcculloch backpiece Paintings.jpg I asked Tilt about how he has drawn ideas for such an extensive project. Here's what he said:

I think that, within a project that takes as long as something like this (5 years), it is inevitable that one will struggle with new ideas. One of the highlights of the project has been watching it go in waves. I enjoyed the process of starting and going in one direction and then trying something different. As I did that more, it freed my mind up to other compositional ideas. Another highlight for me was the growth in understanding the Japanese motif. I have always enjoyed the Japanese aesthetic and this project was perfect for exploring it deeper.
Tilt also said that he would keep a sketchbook in which he made 2-inch thumbnail sketches any time he saw anything that he thought had compositional value, and many of those ideas were then incorporated into the backpiece project.
 
When asked about what motivated him to embark on this 5-year endeavor, he said: "The main idea of this project was to get people to look at the collection and realize the endless potential of the back as a canvas. It seems we are limited in thought until we see possibility, only then can the creative juices can begin to flow."

See more of Tilt's paintings and tattoo work on Instagram, Facebook, and the New Life Tattoo site.
 
Jeromey Mcculloch tattoo.jpg
rock of ages tattoo.JPG
Apr201309
08:58 AM
jondix art.jpgjondix art3.jpgIn Los Angeles this Saturday at the Against the Stream Buddhist Meditation Society, the first print installation by Raking Light Projects will take place featuring the work of tattooer, musician and visual artist Jondix of Barcelona, Spain.

I've been a long-time fan of Jondix's work -- a remarkable portfolio of intricate dotwork & blackwork, an example of which I've shown below.  In his tattoos, you'll find his own interpretation of Eastern iconography and patterns -- and his spiritual and mystical influences are ever present in this exhibit as well.

Entitled Aeons Tulpa, this print and sculpture installation is inspired by Jondix's extensive travels and is described as "a metaphysical exploration of the artist's interior world." Here's more from Raking Light Projects:  

The installation configuration, influenced by cosmology, represents Jondix's metaphysical being. Nine prints are arranged in rows and columns of three to create the shape of a square, with the tenth print displayed off to the side. Central to the installation is the idea of energy and connection, where each of the ten laser-etched prints are not only physically connected by string but also spiritually connected to the artist. The iconography is a confluence of motifs with Jondix's signature mystical imagery and Eastern-influenced patterning. His visual lexicon borrows from Eastern philosophies and incorporates auspicious symbols, deities and ritualistic objects combined with allusions to personal fantasy and science fiction.
Jondix offers his own thoughts on his process for the show:

When you go into deep meditation, Vipassana or transcendental, you enter all the hidden parts of your mind. . . your body secretes endogenously produced drugs and you can have visions. When I was creating this series, I put myself in that position--trying to create something that will come to my mind in the future--and serendipitously I found my favorite place.
Aeons Tulpa will be on view at the Against the Stream gallery for a year. Saturday's opening will take place from 7pm-10pm.

For more on Raking Light Projects, and their art prints created by renowned tattooists, check our post on them here.

Jondix tattoo.jpg
Apr201204
04:10 PM
Horiyoshi art .jpg
London's Somerset House is exhibiting silk paintings and photographs of Japanese tattoo master Horiyoshi III in a special series entitled Kokoro: The Art of Horiyoshi III.

The arts center describes the work:

Kokoro means 'heart' in Japanese; it is the 'feeling', the 'inner meaning' that underpins the Japanese approach not only to art, but to Japanese life as a whole. It is what makes Japan quintessentially Japanese. With this selection of paintings by Irezumi master Horiyoshi III, we hope to make you 'feel' Kokoro; leading you on a journey where the typical japanese nature and legends take life in silk paintings and photographs.

Internationally renowned tattoo artist Horiyoshi III is a great supporter of traditional Japanese culture, history and craftsmanship but yet he embraced the modern western world, observed it, understood it and changed his art, evolving but keeping it japanese; this is ultimately the power and essence of Kokoro. It is a spirit that knows no time or physical limits.
The exhibit is open daily from 10am to 6pm until July 1st and admission is free.

Those who can't swing a London trip can purchase the limited edition "Kokoro" book online from Kofee-Senju Publishers for 199 Euro plus shipping.

For more on Horiyoshi III's work, as well as some historical information on Japanese tattoo, check Don't Panic magazine's article "Horiyoshi III Inks Japan." In it, Kate Kelsall interviews Hiroyoshi's apprentice and assistant Alex Reinke, aka Horikitsune, of Holy FoxTattoos in Germany. Alex is renowned for his own masterful interpretation of Irezumi. He offers his thoughts on Japanese tattooing:

The mystery involved in a Japanese tattoo is beyond Western comprehension as all the designs have deep philosophical meaning. They are heavy with messages of great virtue and portraits of the human condition, so important to the Japanese - to wear a Horimono or Irezumi [that's a full body suit tattoo to you and I] shows character, personality and perseverance and the tattoo master is purveyor of all these things. [...] Basically everyone carries the same designs like koi (carp), dragons, heroes and tenyo (she-angels) but the tattoo artist adapts the story for each individual, changing clothes, expressions and shades to fit that person.
Hit up Don't Panic for more discussion on the art.

Hiroyoshi III.jpg
Aug201112
01:45 PM
quickandpainful.jpg
Marrying low brow art to tattoo flash, Quick & Painful, is a traveling exhibition and tattoo event where 15 artists and designers (with backgrounds in fine art, graffiti, and illustration) present their own special take on classic tattoo design sheets. All of the flash sets will be available for purchase at each of the show dates and available online at The Hope Shop starting October 9th.

The stellar line-up includes Alex Pardee, Amanda Visell, Brandt Peters & Kathie Olivas, Camilla D'Errico, David Horvath, Devilrobots, Greg "Craola" Simkins, Joe Ledbetter, Junko Mizuno, MIST, Ron English, Sam Flores, TADO, Tara McPherson, and Tokidoki co-founder and Creative Director Simone Legno.

At each event, attendees will be able to chose their favorite designs from the sheets off the walls and get them tattooed by renowned artists including Joe Capobianco, Eric Merrill, Julio Rodriguez, Jime Litwalk, Dan Smith, Patrick Cornolo, and Sean Adams. Here's more info on getting tattooed there.

The show bears the definitive mark of its curator, Nichole East, who reached out to iconic artists from her Pop Art background. She says, "After years of working in the low brow and pop art scene, I started to see how many fans were getting tattoos of my favorite artists. It seemed a natural urge to make sure it was done right."

Here are the places and dates for Quick & Painful:

August 27th, 7-10pm
Hope Gallery in New Haven, CT

September 3rd, 7-10pm
Crewest Gallery in Los Angeles, CA

October 8th, 7-10pm
Rotofugi Gallery in Chicago, IL

December 1-4th
Art Basel in Miami, FL

Feb201109
01:29 PM
Tattoo Flyer.jpgBased on the flood of emails we've been getting over this exhibit, it seems London's art circles are amped over the upcoming Pens and Needles show at the London Miles Gallery, opening Friday, February 25th. 

Pens and Needles will feature original paintings, stencils and photographs from over 20 highly respected tattoo artists, including Shawn Barber, Claudia Sabe, Nick Baxter, Nick Colella, Alex Binnie, Mike Davis, Xam, Daniel Albrigo, Holy Fox, Jeff Gogue, Shad, Jondix, Jee Sayalero, Lea Nahon, among many others.

More information on the show can be found here. I particularly like this part of the exhibit description: 

Attitudes towards tattoo art and tattooed individuals continue to evolve for the better. Nowadays, it's getting harder and harder to draw a distinction between fine art and the best of modern tattooing. Doesn't this then make tattooed individuals the new cultural ambassadors of a truly new and distinctive 'modern art'?

Much of today's contemporary and fine art isn't too disparate from that which tattoo artists are creating on skin. Much like their painterly peers, the most accomplished and skilled of tattoo artists assign the same exacting precision to composition, tone, perspective, and conceptual design when producing their own inimitable works of art.
Just call me Cultural Ambassador Kakoulas! 

The opening will also feature live music and live tattooing in their pop-up tattoo parlour. The party runs from from 7 to 11pm. And all are welcome to show off their own body of art. 
Nov201005
02:38 PM
paul ecke human canvas.jpg
An exciting solo show of paintings inspired by tattoo art opens November 19th at the Gebert Gallery in Venice, California: The Human Canvas by Paul Ecke.

Paul contacted me after finding my Black Tattoo Art book last year and being inspired by work he saw in it. I helped put him in contact with a number of the tattoo artists in the book like Yann Black, Rory Keating and Roni Zulu among others, which led to the beautiful collaborations that comprise The Human Canvas series. In this video interview below, Paul and Zulu discuss "how both artist's passions cross over into each other's mediums."





For more on the paintings, Virginia Repasky of Art Management says:

In "The Human Canvas," artist, Paul Ecke explores the reality that each of us is tattooed, some on the outside but all on the inside, where we all hide our burdens and pleasures in a very secret way. This suite is a continuation of the artist's earlier work "Men Behind Gates." "Men Behind Gates" represented a return to his classical figurative training and became an awakening of man's emotional struggles--struggles imposed by society as well as self. Like "Men Behind Gates," this is a raw and an emotionally driven series that is both bold and honest in content. Yet "The Human Canvas" forgoes the implementation of the painted gate and instead propels the viewer to a more provocative and passionate exploration through the form of the tattoo.

Each painting was a collaboration of letters, drawings from tattoo artists and models who all participated to bring each work to fruition. All were united through the commonality of the tattoo--the art form of using skin as canvas. [...]

On the surface, the artist was confronted by the cultural stereotypes of tattoos. Instead he found intellectuals, professionals and artistic expression. He examined the historical, trends and decorative nature of the tattoo and discovered that the tattoo consciously or unconsciously is another form of a doorway to one's deeper self.

The Human Canvas will be on view at the Gebert Gallery until December 15th.
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