Results tagged “geometry”

Jul201428
10:44 AM
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Some interesting tattoo news hit the headlines over the past few days, so I picked my favorites here:

First up, I was happy to see Metro (UK) feature the fantastic tattoo work of Chaim Machlev, Dots to Lines, based in Berlin. What I love about Chaim's work in particular (shown above), in addition to his unique compositions, is how he manages to take strong geometric forms and balance them to the body, really enhancing it. And I'm glad the mainstream media was able to pick up on that as well. See more of Dots to Lines on Chaim's site, Facebook and Instagram.

Also looking at the artistry of tattoos, but with a bent on tributes to pop culture icons, is Kelli Marshall's piece for The Week: "What tattoos can teach us about modern fandom."  Kelli writes that, in the course of studying Hollywood legend Gene Kelley -- and the fandom associated with him -- she's found numerous people who have made their devotion to him permanent and public in the form of tattoos. She speaks with some of the fans, who explain why they got tattoos inspired by Gene Kelley, and also presents some tattoo images, thankfully crediting the artists, which is rare.  I liked this article because it offered some insight into the motivations behind tattoos that many may question because pop culture, and not high art, is the basis for the work. I myself have lay awake at nights wondering why there are numerous people with Gwen Stefani portraits. This article was a check not to judge, and here's a round-up from Kelli why:
As diverse as these tattoos are, they're all rooted in the same thing: the powerful, deeply personal impact that mass culture can have on our private lives. Tattoos based on fandoms are rarely a simple tribute to the movies or TV shows we love; they're muses, reminders of a friend, acts of rebellion, testaments to survival. Tattoos may begin with a fandom -- but they end with the self.
But ... if we're going to judge, there's this: "Tattooed muscians: the good, the bad and the very ugly."

On the more serious news tip, there's a discussion on medic alert tattoos and how the medical community responds to them. As noted in the article, there's debate over whether first responders will consider tattoos that note medical conditions, say "Diabetic, Type 1," instead of the standard bracelets that convey that information. One argument is the following:
"We're not going to stop to read a tattoo in an emergency situation," said Don Lundy, president of the National Association of Emergency Medical Technicians. "They can be complicated and hard to read. Medical bracelets and necklaces are what stand out."
On the flip side, tattoos are being taken more seriously to alert certain conditions, and the article notes that it could be useful for organizations, like the American Diabetes Association, to offer guidelines on the placement and general shape for tattoos.

Finally, the Washington Post reports on Baghdad tattoo parlors. There have actually been a number of articles written on the underground tattoo scene in Iraq, but this one is worth a read for the reporting on the surrounding culture that has led to shops opening up despite the danger in doing so.
Jul201421
07:59 AM
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Neo Tattoo1.jpgWhile reading the wonderful Things & Ink blog, I came across the latest work of Delaine "Neo" Gilma of Stichfreudig Tattoo Studio in Zurich, Switzerland. Tattooing since 2000, Neo's portfolio is heavily influenced by geometry, illustration, and also indigenous tattooing, blending the traditional with the modern.

Inked magazine did a Q &A with Neo,  and here's a bit from that talk:

How did you get into tattooing? I was always interested in Polynesian cultures and all those mysterious shaman and headhunter tattoos, so I designed some for myself and got them inked in the late 90s. I was studying industrial design during that time, which became pretty technically and economically orientated, so I needed something rude and archaic to bring me back to where I started, before I found myself designing light bulbs. So I was hanging around more in the tattoo studio of a good friend than at the university. One day Alex (who also did my first tattoos) asked me if I wanted to become his apprentice. It seemed obvious that industrial design wouldn't be my way for the future, so I quit and did tattoos.

How do you describe your style? Geometric pattern orientated sci-fi graffiti style flavored with a heartwarming drop of comic characters and occult symbolism.

What inspires you as an artist? I've been asked this one lots of times, and mostly I lose myself in listing up things of interest in my perception, like natural rock-structures, op art, ancient aliens or quantum physics (I like things that sound scientific). But in the end I guess it's the same for all artists; it's just an open eye and mind for everything. I mean, inspiration comes from things you like, things that impress you, things that frighten you, from whatever leaves an imprint in your soul so you want to explain it with your brain or enjoy it with your heart and that's why I do the things I do.

What has been one of the strangest tattoos you've ever done? A pretty strange but very cool one was an ant-trail from the toe over the back to the palm of the hand. The ants were carrying lots of wicked things over that girl's body. Most people would think doing a straight line across the body is strange, but for me writing your own name or doing a fairy on a flower is far more strange.
Check more of Neo's work on his site, Instagram and Facebook.
Jan201410
08:56 AM
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It's really exciting to find artists with distinct styles who are able to take common themes and make them very much their own. One such artist is Cody Eich, currently at Studio 13 in Fort Wayne, Indiana. I shot Cody a few questions about his work and he graciously took the time to offers thoughtful responses:

You're able to meld very different artistic influences together to great effect. What's your process like in putting it all together?

I've always loved contrast and balance.  Generally, I like to use one form or color to compliment the other in some way.  I also like breaking the rules.  I like putting objects or shapes in my artwork that aren't normally there.  Don't get me wrong, I think there are plenty of technical rules that need to be learned and followed by any tattoo artist, which are things that a fine artist or someone using another medium wouldn't necessarily have to worry about.  I always think about how a piece will last over time as it ages, my linework and saturation of a tattoo, but I've always loved that there is no real "right" answer to the artwork in tattooing or in other creative fields, so I feel free in my work when I get to break the rules. 

Where do you draw your inspiration and references?

I always say nature and the universe we live in are absolutely the most interesting art created by the most creative creator.  The seemingly chaotic but complete order of nature and the relationship between every living things is absolutely astounding to me.  Ordered chaos.  So, I love using natural things as reference for my tattoos, whether it be a person, animal, plant, rocks and geology, or anything else.  I find mechanical things or manmade things less interesting.  That being said, I also worked at an engineering firm for seven years prior to tattooing, and I find myself inadvertently and sometimes purposefully drawing inspiration from plan sheets and other civil engineering based imagery.  Things like topographic style lines, engineering linetypes from computer aided drawing programs will often pop up in my paintings and tattoos next to, or juxtaposed with, natural subject matter.  Lastly, I am continually inspired by other artists, fine and tattoo based, and being new to the industry I have so much to learn still from people who have been doing this much longer than I have.

Rooster.jpgWhat point in your tattoo career did you feel that your own particular style broke through -- or did you begin tattooing your own art from the outset?

When I started painting before I was tattooing, I felt free to paint whatever I wanted because it was mine, and it was for me in my head.  There were no consequences.  With tattoos, it took me a bit to really put "my" mark on someone else.  Because my clients didn't start off asking for geometric shapes and other design elements that I like using, my tattoos were very stunted until I was encouraged by the owners of Studio 13 in Fort Wayne to make the art I wanted rather than strictly what the client was asking for.  From the time I started working there in 2012, they encouraged me to redraw my tattoos for clients before I tattooed them if I hadn't added my touch to the line drawings.  Once I started getting some of these tattoos that were more my style out there, people seemed to like them, so it really encouraged me to push things a bit more and develop something unique that I wanted to do. 

In a number of your tattoos, I see forms that look like constellations -- what's your intention behind them?

People always assume the shapes that you're talking about in my tattoos are constellations, so I sometimes just make up a name for them as if they are actually out there in space.  I have only actually tattooed one real constellation ever.  They are really just design elements that I started playing with as a way to put geometric, angular shapes next to organic forms in my artwork.  Contrast.

BIRD HAND.jpg I read on your Tumblr page that you will be making the move to Southern Ontario. Is that still in the works? Where can people find you in the next few months?

I am from the States, but am immigrating to Canada as my wife, Alisha, is from Canada.  After we got married in December 2012, we filled out all the paperwork and jumped through all the hoops with that and were able to submit our paperwork in March 2013.  I believe the average processing time is about a year, so I'm hoping that March of 2014 will mean I will be okay to live and work in Canada as a permanent resident.  In the meantime I have been okayed to live in Canada while I'm waiting to work, so I live with my wife in Brantford, Ontario and return to the States every month for about a week and a half to work with the wonderful people at Studio 13 in Fort Wayne, Indiana.  I'm hoping to be working full time in Canada sometime around March 2014 and am adding people to a wait list for once this happens, so I can start scheduling appointments as soon as my paperwork goes through.

For more on Cory, click:
Codyeichtattoo.com
Instagram: @codyeichtattoo
Facebook facebook.com/cody.eich
Tumblr codyeich.tumblr.com
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Nov201318
08:33 AM
Maika Tattoo.jpgmaika tattoo 2.jpgFor organic-meets-industrial-geometric tattoos, check out the portfolio of Maika Houde, of Tattoos by Maika, in Montreal, Canada.

This self-taught tattooist, who began painting when she was 9 years old thanks to her artist mother, picked up the tattoo machine in 2005, and has since developed a signature style that plays with various forms outside of traditional tattooing. She says of her influences: 

I am inspired a lot by abandoned industrial sites in decay, rusted pieces of machinery, destroyed cities landscapes, architectural landscapes and also of course geometry. And I am fascinated with contrast such as organic shapes versus extremely technical geometric pattern, shape or design.
 
My tattoo influences are artists such as Little Swastika, Gerhard Wiesbeck, Rob Hoskins, Cory Ferguson, Xed Lehead, Jondix, Vincent Hocquet.
I also asked Maika about her tattoo process:

As for my Organic/Industrial Geometry work, I usually work first on paper, of course, after having consulted once with the client. But, to make it fit nicely on the body, I usually draw parts of the design on the clients and build it on them in the first session. [...]

Some clients give me more details and are more specific on what they want, but in the end, I do what my creative mind tells me to do. So there are times where I don't include everything they ask for simply because, esthetically, technically, or for whatever other reason, it wouldn't fit nicely. Once I explain that to them, they are pretty ok with it, or we adjust depending on if there's something I previously took out and that they really wanted in there.

I also try to keep them away from cliches, or if I keep the cliched idea, I make sure I totally destroy it by making it something new and beautiful -- and other times a cliched [design] can be pretty beautiful -- maybe I should call these ideas "classics"; it is all really a feeling based on who's in front of me and how I feel in the moment, so it's a very "organic" way to work and it changes with each client and project.

When asked about her particular clientele, Maika explains:

A fascinating thing I have noticed is that a lot of my clientele are engineers, biologists, scientists of some sort, architects, doctors, mathematicians ... they come from the left side of the brain and I've found it an interesting mix: their left side of the brain encounters my right side of the brain! Ha! It feels like it's an opening, a welcome sign, for the left-sided brain people into the world of tattoo. There's a lot more "geeky" & "nerdy" tattoos in the world now, where before there wasn't! I think it's exciting!
Maika often does guest spots out of Edmonton, Toronto, Quebec City, and will be expanding her travel into Europe. She'll be working the Frankfurt Convention in 2014, among other shows.

You can find most of Maika's work on her Facebook page, Twitter, and Instagram [@Tattoobymaika]. 

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