Results tagged “sacred geometry”

Sep201430
07:05 AM
zac scheinbaum tattoo 4.jpgzac scheinbaum tattoo snake.jpgI was excited to learn that, earlier this month, one of NYC's premiere tattoo studios, Kings Avenue Tattoo, welcomed a new tattoo artist to their roster: Zac Scheinbaum. Zac rounds out the Kings Ave crew with a portfolio filled with my favorite things: dots, geometry and lots of black ink. I hit up Zac with a few questions about his work:   

You've recently become a part of Kings Avenue Tattoo, coming from Saved Tattoo. As both studios have a high bar for excellence, what was your path like in tattooing to reach that bar?

I learned to tattoo in Santa Fe, New Mexico, at a shop called Four Star Tattoo. Mark Vigil apprenticed me. He is a very knowledgeable and incredibly talented tattooer. When I met him, and the years that followed, he showed me everything about how tattoos should be done, and the right and wrong ways that he thought to do things. I feel like I still learn and recall things he said to me all those years ago and they are totally relevant. But he also definitely "raised" me in a sense to have a high volume of respect for everything dealing with the craft...and artists that do it.

I initially came to New York to get my arm done by Mike Rubendall. He was a huge influence on me and definitely helped me to be where I am today even from back then. I also would've never met Chris O'Donnell without Mike. I had gotten tattooed by Scott Campbell over at Saved many years before and always thought that it would be so awesome to work there.

Long story short (sort of, after a rocky goodbye and a few months on St. Mark's), I ended up at Saved.  Both Kings Avenue and Saved have always been gigantic influences on me and my work. It is a fulfillment of life dreams and goals to have the opportunity to work around these amazing artists.

 How do you work to become better and better at your craft?

I never feel satisfied with my work, and I think that's important. I'm always trying to learn and get better. I sort of think of it as getting an education from all of these different amazing teachers, then taking things you like and don't like about what advice you are given, and deciding how to implement that to best fit your clients and your vision of the final piece of work.

zac scheinbaum tattoo1.jpgI'm a fan of your style of blackwork and dotwork tattooing. How did you come to your style and what references do you seek out for your work?

The use of black and white imagery is what I have always been the most comfortable doing. I would love to do more color work also, but it is definitely a little harder for me to grasp sometimes. That being said, the strong use of dotwork and geometric tattooing that I do, I can attribute directly to Thomas Hooper. When he came to Saved, it definitely changed my mentality -- whether it was about my philosophy for tattoos, work ethic, design, and overall aesthetics, he had such a smart and different way of doing things. I really admire him and wouldn't be where I am without him. I've always loved this type of tattooing (Xed Le Head, Tomas Tomas, Jondix, Mike the Athens), but never understood how it was even possible. Thomas showed me how to make mandalas and how he suggested doing things, and I sort of took that, then just ran with it on my "own" after he left.

I'd say that, just within five years, the appreciation for blackwork and dotwork tattoos has grown exponentially in the US. Do you think that's accurate \? What are your thoughts on the growing interest in these styles?

I think every style of tattooing has a time and a place, and this just happens to be the time where this type of tattooing is getting a little bit more notoriety and acknowledgment, but I'm sure, as with all things, it will pass and something else will come up instead of it. Not that that's a bad or a good thing, but I think it's definitely something that, when people think of tattoos, this was just  something they hadn't seen before and that's why it got so big -- because they didn't realize what was possible, or that a tattoo could be so detailed.

What do you love about tattooing?

I love tattooing because it's has given me the opportunity to do art  every single day. I feel so honored that anybody would like to get tattooed by me. It means the world to me. Not only has tattooing integrated itself into every aspect of my life, whether I'm reading or having dinner or whatnot, I always can find new ideas everywhere. It lets you create all the time! You get to make people happy, and give them something that can change their lives.

What projects, travels, events are coming up for you that you'd like to share?

I'm working on a series of new paintings, and hopefully some flash. I am planning a trip to Japan early next year, but am not sure the exact dates yet.

***
Find more of Zac's work on his site and Instagram.

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Jun201403
09:58 PM
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I'm very fortunate to have shelves of beautiful tattoo and art books from artists across the globe -- books I've learned a great deal from and books that inspire posts for this blog. But it is not often that a book inspires how I envision further work on my own tattoos and has me excited about different possibilities of expression when designing the next steps of my body suit.

One such book is "Solstice Mandala" by George "Orge" Kalodimas of Sake Tattoo in Athens, Greece.

Last July, I first wrote about the Solstice Mandala project in which Orge set out to create
a mandala a day, from June 21st, the Summer Solstice, to December 21st, the Winter Solstice. And he did so. Here's more:

In the morning of 21st of June, Orge was listening to the radio and was reminded that this is the biggest day of the year. This reminder pushed him to later spend hours online learning about the Solstice circle and the unstoppable circle of life every year since the beginning of time. That's when inspiration stroke. He would design one mandala per day for the next 184 days, paying tribute to the solstice. He spent every day for 6 months designing a new mandala inspired by religion, nature and sacred geometry.
Those 184 mandalas are beautifully presented in a lush, limited edition 128-page hardcover with embossed sleeve. Even more wonderful is that the book is accompanied by a signed & numbered limited print.

And the most wonderful part:  the book is available for purchase at only 75 Euros (about $102 US).

Personally, I love how Orge has created mandalas that are incredibly detailed with various patterns and imagery, but would not overwhelm the body and would translate beautifully when the art is put on skin.

For more on how Solstice Mandala came to be, check this great video below.

And for more on Orge's tattoo and fine art work, check his Facebook and Instagram pages.

Oct201316
09:00 AM
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Thanks to Facebook, I was reminded that today is the birthday of one of my favorite blackwork artists: Roxx of 2Spirit Tattoo in San Francisco. Happy birthday, Roxx!

So when I went to the 2Spirit Facebook page, I found stunning new work that I had to share. Roxx is not only known for some of the boldest blackwork around (as shown below), but she is also able to create light and intricate sacred geometry patterns and, as evidenced by the very top photo, use the simplest forms to the greatest effect.

You can catch Roxx at the Bay Area Convention of the Tattoo Arts, Oct. 25-27.  She'll also be in NYC working to transform mastectomy scars on P.Ink Day, October 21st at Saved Tattoo.  [More on P.Ink Day here.]

I'm also honored that Roxx is one of the featured artists in Black Tattoo Art 2.

More of her work can be found on Instagram.

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