Results tagged “video”

Sep201426
08:47 AM


It's now the science geeks' turn at making a viral video, and this one, I really like. If you haven't seen it when Ricky posted it to the Needles and Sins Facebook group this week, check out Destin Sandlin's Tattooing Close Up video.

Destin, of the YouTube channel Smarter Every Day, wanted to find out how tattoos work, so he went Timepiece Tattoo in Huntsville, Alabama, and hung out with the crew there to learn more about what they do -- and also get an inkless tattoo by resident tattooer Leah Farrow.

He then shot an up-close, slow motion video of a tattoo, explaining the science of a tattoo machine (Leah corrects his use of "tattoo gun") and how ink is put into skin.

Even if this is old info to many of you, it's still interesting how he puts it all together in this video package. Worth a look.  

For more up-close tattoo goodness, check this slow motion tattoo video, which we posted in May, that has more of an art than science focus.
Sep201402
07:10 PM


I came across this wonderful "Tattoo Soldiers" video, via Lal Hardy, in which three heavily tattooed Australian soldiers discuss some of the stories behind their tattoos ... or as the voiceover says, it's a "talk on titivating the torso."  The video title reflects that the film was taken in 1942, and it's interesting how the discussions of one's tattoos -- and the excitement so often behind such talks -- hasn't really changed much.  
Aug201408
03:43 PM

The Nothing Tattoo from Pear Films on Vimeo.

The experience of getting tattooed, rather that the end product of that experience -- the permanent mark -- is the focus of "The Nothing Tattoo" video by Pear Films.  In the video, tattooer Veronica Tricker of ON2U Tattoo in Saskatoon, SK, offers inkless tattoos of the word "nothing" (which another tattooer draws for her). She explains that people have come to her with questions on what getting a tattoo is like, but do not want to commit to any artwork. So, in the footage, she tattoos two clients with water rather than ink, using the same needle depth, materials, plastic wrap-up, etc. to answer such questions.

Two particular points of interest in this video for me:  First, Veronica is a tattooer who has no tattoos. This made me question what kind of real experience she could offer -- other than technically needling skin -- if she has never had the experience herself. She raises the issue of her tattoo-free skin and offers sort of a defense of her choices. I happen to be in the camp that believes tattooers should be tattooed, and I'm not really swayed by her arguments; however, she articulates her position well.

Also, it got me thinking about what is the tattoo experience about:  Is it just the opening of skin? Is it that "Oh shit" moment when you realize you are changing your body permanently and the trust you must have in the person doing that to you? Is it the story behind getting tattoo? ....

Obviously, the answers are all personal and individual, but thinking on them has led to some fun mental gymnastics for me this afternoon.

What do you think? Share your thoughts in our Needles & Sins Facebook group or hit me up on Twitter.
Jul201413
10:48 AM


I enjoyed this illustrated TEDEd tattoo tutorial video "What makes tattoos permanent?" by Claudia Aguirre (animation by TOGETHER). It's basic info on how tattoos are made and answers questions such as, "If Humans Shed So Much Dead Skin, How Are Tattoos Permanent?" (as noted by Gizmodo), but the presentation of the material is clever and worth a watch.

[Thanks, Tommy, for the link!]
Jun201427
06:05 AM
doc forbes tattoo.pngA must-watch, absolute gem of tattoo history can be found in this 1964 profile on Doc Forbes entitled "The Diary of a Tattooist." CBC 20/20 host Harry Mannis visited Doc Forbes at his studio in Victoria, B.C. and interviewed the legendary tattooer, as well as his clients, who include a mother of four, an 82-year-old man, "Doc's lady friend Helen," and two sailors as they sit in Doc's chair. Doc even tattoos Mannis (without ink), so the host could understand the sensation.

There are just so many fascinating elements to the 32-minute video, including Doc's discussion on hygiene and safety in tattooing; how he mixes pigments and runs his machine a certain way for particular artistic effects; how his clientele is not limited to sailors but all kinds of people, and so much more. I also love the interviews with his clients, especially "his lady friend" who is heavily tattooed, but chose not to reveal her artwork, and so they measured her dresses so that she can always cover them.

There are some moments when the host is interviewing Doc while his machine is running and the sound quality isn't great, but stick with it and enjoy the program until the end. It's worth it. 

[Thanks to Thomas the Tall Tattooed Typographer for the link!]



Jun201425
01:52 PM
yama tattoo.jpg
In what seems like a film trailer to a blockbuster superhero film, this slowmotion tattoo video (embedded below), featuring Michael Taguet of Yama Tattoo, goes deep into the tattooer's process with a tight close-up view, which introverts may find a little too intimate. I really liked it and thought it was a fun way to see how an artist works, from sketch to stencil to tattooing to wipedown, and more important, to view a great finish to all the build-up.

The video was created by Stephane Couchoud of Millenium-Studio, and filmed at Yama Tattoo, which is in Saint-Chamond, Loire, of the Rhone-Alpes region in France. The work created in the video has that very graphic Neotraditional bent to it, but Michael works in a variety of tattoo styles. Check more of his tattoos here.

In May, we featured another slowmotion tattoo video, also of a French artist, Parisian tattooer GueT.

It should be interesting to see what other ways filmmakers present tattoo art to the public.


Thanks, Julien, for the link!
Jun201416
09:04 AM
daddy has a tattoo.jpg
On the heels of Father's Day yesterday, I just learned that our friend Phil Padwe, creator of
"Mommy Has a Tattoo" and "Daddy Has a Tattoo," has recently posted the entire "Daddy Has A Tattoo" book on YouTube (embedded below).

Phil's children's books, which are wonderfully illustrated, set out to teach, in a light and fun way, tattoo appreciation, and talk about why some moms and dads may look a little more colorful than others. If you've ever been asked by kids why you have drawings on your arms, these books offer some ideas when you want to avoid talking about that drunken night in Thailand.

You can buy "Daddy Has a Tattoo" on Amazon, as well as the "Tattoo Coloring Book." Or just put the kiddies in front of your computer screen and have them watch the story unfold online.

Apr201421
08:16 PM
american eagle tattoo.jpg
psycho tattoo.jpg
Top tattoo by Soda Pop and bottom by Sky Cris.

As part of their San Diego small business series, The Circus Cartel produced this video (embedded below) profiling Broken Heart Tattoo. In the 5-minute film, tattooer and shop owner Sky Cris talks about what drew him to the art form and his path along that way, but what I really enjoyed was listening to him discuss some points on the business aspect of running a tattoo studio. As their portfolios are not really highlighted here as much as other tattoo docs we've featured, this discussion, and also that of the genesis of the shop, was the most engaging for me.

I particularly smiled when Sky explains how he came to the name Broken Heart Tattoo -- how people often get tattooed when they are down and out to feel better. He also references a song in which one of the lines inspired him: "There's a man on the corner who fixes broken hearts..."  And that's seems to drive their work.

You can find Sky's tattoos, as well as that of resident artist Soda Pop, on the Broken Heart site and Facebook page.

Broken Heart Tattoo from The Circus Cartel on Vimeo.

Mar201426
09:42 AM


Featuring some of black & grey's finest, "Tattoo Stories" is a video series by Estevan Oriol and Mister Cartoon, with the goal of exploring the work, and personal lives, of esteemed tattooers from an insider's perspective -- and not just the usual "How long have you been tattooing?" Q & As.

The videos, which average around 6-7 minutes, take you into the studios of legends such a Jack Rudy and Rick Walter's, who offer tattoo history as well as philosophy lessons. There are also interviews with some of the most exceptional tattooers today, including Shawn Barber, Chuey Quintanar, Carlos Torres, Luke Wessman, Franco Vescovi, and many others.   

The series launched last summer, and when I first checked their SanctionedTV YouTube page at that time, I thought it was largely focused on their "LA Woman" series. As we stay away from the "tattoo model" thing, I didn't share it.  And so it was a happy surprise to go back and see that so much important tattoo footage, and not just T&A, had been amassed and offered in an engaging way.

Oh, and there's also this really moving Snoop Dog (yes, Snoop Dog) vid.
Mar201417
08:08 PM


In celebration of St. Patrick's Day, I'm sharing this 8-minute video "Skin Deep:  A Youth Culture Tattoo Documentary," by Thinkhouse, which explores tattooing in Ireland through the reflections of Irish tattooers, seasoned and new. The artists include Kev McNamara and Sylwia Butkiewicz of Dublin Ink, Anto Ross of Spilled Ink, and Bren Harte of Dragon Tattoo.

There's some interesting discussion on the "unspoken rules" of not getting tattooed on hands, necks and faces until you have a lot of coverage; the reasons behind why so many young people in Ireland are heavily tattooed; and also thoughts on what tattooing will be like in 10 years. I recommend a look (perhaps with some Guinness).

[Video link via Some Quality Meat.]
Dec201317
12:36 PM
russian prison tattoos.jpg
Screen shot from The History Channel's "Marked."

Over at Tattoo Artist Magazine, Nicki recently posted this video (embedded below) of an episode from The History Channel's "Marked", which focuses on Russian prison tattoos -- the heavy symbolism, gritty technique, and complex underworld structure associated with them. It's an interesting 45-minute close-up at this segment of tattoo culture. However, I have to note that my favorite film on the subject remains Alix Lambert's "The Mark of Cain," which is available for purchase online.

The "Marked" series, and its look at the seedier side of tattoos, are geared for a wider audience, driven by TV storytelling than in-depth research, and yet, the episodes offer more than just pure entertainment and are worth the watch. If you're looking for a holiday gift, the Season 1 box set of "Marked" could be a good bet.

But if you're looking for inspiration for your next tattoo, I say skip the mob markings, and look to more artful -- and safer -- designs.

Dec201313
12:56 PM

In The Guardian today is feature called "Painted Ladies: Why women get tattoos." Normally, I find these types of articles banal, or even cringe worthy, for perpetuating cliches or not offering a broad spectrum of experience from our community. And so I was happily surprised to find many different voices of tattooed women in this article.

While there need not be any great miraculous reason to get tattooed, tattoos do come with a story, from an impulse to get a quick piece of historic flash to a full body project. I found the profiles of these women to be really interesting, and they made me think on the commonaIities and differences of our experiences with tattoos.

I particularly loved reading about Juanita Carberry, a merchant navy steward, who died in July at age 88. Here's a bit from her story:

The daughter of a renegade Irish peer, Carberry lived an extraordinarily full life. Her childhood in Kenya was difficult: her mother, a well-known aviator, died when she was three, and Carberry was often beaten by her governess. As a teenager, she was a key witness in a celebrated murder case, the 1941 shooting of the 22nd Earl of Erroll, and at 17 she joined the first aid nursing yeomanry in the Women's Territorials during the second world war. In 1946, Carberry became one of a handful of women to join the merchant navy, remaining for 17 years. It was during this period, says photographer Christina Theisen, that she started acquiring tattoos. Her first was a small spider on the sole of her foot; it didn't hurt, Theisen recalls Carberry saying, because the skin on her feet was so tough from walking barefoot as a child.

Read more here.

It is the work of Christina Theisen and Eleni Stefanou that really makes this piece so engaging. Theisen and Stefanou are behind womenwithtattoos.co.uk, a photo and film endeavor that pays respect to all tattooed women. They offer this on their work: "Our project seeks to capture the personal and the individual, embracing each woman and her tattoos as one, rather than isolating or magnifying the inked parts of her body. At the same time, by using natural environments and the context of urban Western culture, we intentionally move away from the sexualised glamour model aesthetic that dominates tattoo magazines and popular culture."

Two words: Hell. Yeah. 

My regret is that I wasn't aware of the project when it first rolled out. I will continue to follow Theisen and Stefanou's work, and I hope that more media outlets also follow their lead in telling compelling stories without the usual pop culture hype and flash so prevalent today.

Jun201310
09:01 AM
Jun Cha tattoo 1.jpgJun Cha tattoo 2.jpgWe've been seeing a lot of "pop-up" tattoo studios from renowned artists around the world, in which art spaces are constructed to present the tattooers' work, often before the eyes of the art and design community. Almost like a guest spot, but with a spotlight.

LA-based tattooist Jun Cha recently worked a 14-day pop-up tattoo studio in Paris, and filmmaker Santiago Arbelaez captured that trip. That footage is beautifully put together in the video below.  The video shows Jun working on a sleeve (shown above in the first image) that best demonstrates his style, which melds black & grey fine line with classical and Renaissance art. Jun talks about his influences in the video, and he also offers some background about how he came to tattooing at the young age of 16 and progressed from there into a sought-after tattooist.  There are also wonderful Paris street and museum scenes as well. A great 4-minute break to add some beauty to your day.  

Check more of Jun's work online:

juncha.net
twitter.com/juncha
facebook.com/juncha
instagram.com/jun_cha
 
Jun201307
08:46 AM


When I read "tattoo secrets revealed" on CNN, I kinda groaned. These quick and cutesy news clips on tattoos tend to all be the same...BUT when I watched it, I found that our friends over at the beautiful 13 Roses Tattoo Parlor in Atlanta, Georgia were the artists sharing the shop talk, so I knew it would be good. The video is super fun, especially learning about the type of tattoos pious preachers are getting these days! At just a minute and a half, it's worth the click.

Check the tattoo work of the 13 Roses Tattoo artists on their site and on Facebook.
May201310
09:42 PM

The Union presents Dan Dringenberg from Fellowship Supply Co. on Vimeo.

Watch this video and understand why Dan Dringenberg is a legend.

May201307
08:51 AM


There's a great video of Ed Hardy in his San Francisco art studio by Bloomberg Business week, entitled "The Hideaway of America's Most Famous Tattoo Artist" (embedded above). While less than 3-minutes long, it packs some juicy info, from Ed's past to the art he is creating today. The highlight of the video is when Ed whips out a box filled with old tattoo designs he created when he was just 10 years old, and he chats about using Maybeline eyeliner at the time to "tattoo" the kids in the neighborhood. You'll also see his latest paintings, which are quite different from his iconic tattoo imagery. It's a must watch.

Also, on Bloomberg Business week, there's a short piece called, "How to Get Rich With Tattoos, by Artist Don Ed Hardy," in which Ed writes of his start in tattooing and how he ended up being a brand name.

The real Ed Hardy story comes out in his memoir Wear Your Dreams: My Life in Tattoos, to be released on June 18th. I have an advance copy next to me and will be writing a review soon. Meanwhile, you can pre-order your copy on Amazon.com.

For more on Ed, check my 2011 interview with him for Inked mag.
Feb201324
11:22 AM


Earlier, I posted on how Scott Versago of Empire Ink transformed the "world's worst portrait tattoo" into a proper tribute. But I can't help but think he was inspired by Misha's House of Reawakening Tattoo Salon, and the video shown above.
Feb201315
05:36 AM

The Gypsy Gentleman - Episode 06: Paris from Marcus Kuhn on Vimeo.

In the latest installment of Markus Kuhn's The Gypsy Gentleman series, the veteran tattooer travels to Paris to hook up with his renowned colleagues (and good friends) Laura Satana and the inimitable Tin Tin. There, he shows us the sights of the city, talks tattoos, and draws some skulls. Because of his closeness with Laura and Tin Tin, and Paris itself, it feels like you're watching a more intimate, personal video -- but one that is beautifully produced. Check it.
Dec201211
07:51 AM


I'm digging Michael Paul's "One Minute Doc" series, particularly this video profile on Buzzy Jenkins of Fine Tattoo Work in Orange County, Ca. It starts off with Buzzy making needles (rarely see that these days!) and goes through the process of creating a tattoo while his discusses his tattoo philosophy in voice over. The Black Keys makes a perfect sound track for this tight and informative video. Check it.

Also check more of Buzzy's tattoo work.
Dec201203
08:53 AM


So I'm at a friend's house last night and we're trying to dissect the never-ending popularity that is "Gangnam Style," the pop song by South Korean rapper Psy whose video, according to the Chicago Tribune, "recently became the most watched item ever posted to YouTube with more than 800 million views."  I made an offhand comment that something so viral in pop culture will eventually be someone's tattoo.

We googled. And we wept.

There is not only a Gangnam Style tattoo, there is a video of its own. Our dismay, however, was more about subject matter than actual execution. The tattoo, which is documented in the video from sketch to finish (perhaps a minute too long), is actually pretty good. But I nevertheless think that parodies and tributes should generally stay on YouTube and not in skin.

What do you think about these pop culture fad tattoos?  Post your comments in the N+S Facebook Group or Tweet at us.
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